Perthes Disease

Hey all,

I've only been running a couple of weeks, but I've started having problems with my hip. When I was young, I was diagnosed with Perthes disease in my right hip. It was caught very early, and happened when I was very young. This eventually sorted itself out and I've had basically no trouble from it for many years. Info on Perthes

But on a mellow run last night, I started getting pain in the joint of my bad hip. I was only a mile from finishing my run, so just pushed on through. When I got home, I popped an ibuprofen, had a nice stretch and a shower and was fine.

The roads I was running on weren't the best, kind of uneven and crap. I do own a good pair of trainers which I got from a proper running shop after they'd done gait analysis on me (turns out I'm a bad over pronator). I don't stretch BEFORE run, just take it slow for the first 10mins or so and do a good stretch after my run. As I said, the run wasn't stupid quick. 8:30mins/mile, which for me is good but not exactly killing myself.

So, has anyone got any advice on dealing with hip pain/injuries? And if anyone else has had Perthes and has advice that'd be epic. image

J

EDIT: I'm 18 now btw, and I've been running round about 4-5 miles every other day for the past couple of weeks, following a training schedule I found on t'internet.

Comments

  • Tracey GTracey G ✭✭✭
    ShleyBey - It would be a good idea to see a physio to check that your hip is still ok. You could go and see your doctor to ask him to refer you to one, but you could be waiting a long time to see one on the NHS. As you are only 18 you don't want to damage your hip at your age.
  • K9K9 ✭✭✭

    Hello - ShleyBey...well done for getting out there and running - but 4-5 miles every other day sounds a lot for any new runner. Whilst your fitness may be good enough to cope with that, running is a pretty high impact sport on your muscles and joints, and you need to build up very slowly to allow your body to adapt to the stresses.

    I would have thought this would be even more crucial for someone like yourself with a history of hip disease.

    Agree with Tracey - it would be worth a visit to a sports physio or even an orthopaedic surgeon for some advice on this.

  • Hi

    I think an X-ray is in order, Perthes leads to deformity of the femoral head (the ball of the ball and socket joint), so better to check it out before anyrhing else.

     JP

  • UPDATE: Went to see my GP today, he immediately said that he'd like to put me in for an x-ray. So, I'll update again when I know if there's any problems image
  • Hey, ShleyBey! I know you posted this almost 9 years ago, but I just found your post and related to it a lot. Are you still running? Didn't see an update after your X-Ray.

    I am a (wannabe)runner who also recovered from Perthes as a kid. I started running 4 years ago, and initially suffered the same problems that you describe with my hips. I went for a check-up, and my Physician advised me against any sports that could cause impact on my hips, such as running.

    A year later, I met a very good running coach, who is also a physician. He told me I would have no problem running (even with my Perthes background), if I had the proper training. So, he sent me to the gym for 3 months, to strengthen my body, and gave me a tailored-made running training for my first Marathon in Early 2016.

    My PR is not impressive at all (4:20 hrs), but I managed to do what I once thought impossible. I still run occasionally, and I am currently training for my third Marathon.

    Aches and pains in my hip are mostly gone. They just come back when I take prolonged periods without any training. As some people told you, you have to take it easy, train properly and give your body time to adapt.

    I'd love to hear back from you, specially with an update on your experience.

    Wish you all the best!
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