Ban Striking

It occurs to that the term striking in regard to a runners landing foot insinuates a deliberate attempt to apply force to the ground. As the ambition of the landing foot is to land with minimal impact on the ground surely the term striking is a misnomer with negative potentialy harmful connotations especialy in regard to people injuring themselves by hitting the ground overly hard with there foot .
«134567

Comments

  • you are off your feckin trolley.
  • What poor grammar.

    Strike: Etymology: Middle English, from Old English strīcan to stroke, go; akin to Old High German strīhhan to stroke.

    Stroke seems to me to be a fairly gentle activity.
    I see nothing in the word 'striking' that infers "negative potentialy harmful connotations" with regard to running.

    You don't hit a match yet you strike it. You don't hit a keyboard or strings for example yet these are struck.

    It's 'their' not there.

  • TROLL!!!!!!

    he's off again....

  • totally and utterly barking!
  • Surely we have a right to strike as long as we have a ballot first.....................

    Are you trying to take my legal rights away from meimage

  • Ricky... Is English your first language?

    If not, make your life easier and don't use long words like "insinnuate" if you can't use them in the right context.

  • It's in his dictionary next to 'concurrent', another word of which he is fond but uses completely inappropriately.
    And with his diabolical spelling why can't he at least take the time to use the spell checker?

    And why do I compulsively read his threads? image

  • Careful Meldy the forum police might still be chasing you image
  • In modern usage the term strike means to hit. Its usualy used in regard to boxing or other martial arts.
  • 'Misnomer' means an incorrect word.  If you say 'striking' is a misnomer, then that would mean that it's a word that doesn't correctly describe the action, so it follows that it's only the word that's wrong, not the action. Hence if it's only the word that's wrong, we're talking semantics! 

  • Ricky

     I can tell by you're threads that your a man of great learning.......... and I have a question which is troubling me.

    Your original post insinuates that if I land on my toes the resulting concurrent impact will be less than if I land on my heel. I don't understand why, and I can't begin to imagine how you developed such an imaginative theory.......

    please PLEASE please explain more.......

  • Ricky...

    If I speak very slowly and clearly, using modern English and short words......

    WHAT.... YOU... SAY... IS... NOT.... NEW!!!

    WE... DO... NOT... NEED... LESSONS...

    WHAT...  YOU... ARE... SAYING... HAS... BEEN... SAID... (BETTER...) MANY... TIMES.... BEFORE... 

    SEE... HERE....

    http://www.posetech.com

    http://www.chirunning.com

    http://www.chirunning.com

    and here...

    http://www.learn-english-online.org

    http://www.oed.com

  • Ricky, very interesting but could you answer this question:

    Do you believe that Google are owned by the mafia?

  • To all the people who would like to expound their knowledge of grammar and the english language I would like to inform you all without meaning to give offence to those who's intentions to inform lesser mortals, no matter if it is on grammatical matters. spelling, punctuation or any other aspect. that it all a load of bollocks,

  • Flat Footed wrote (see)
    Careful Meldy the forum police might still be chasing you image
    S'ok  I am well protected  image



  • Ricky Bennison wrote (see)
    In modern usage the term strike means to hit. Its usualy used in regard to boxing or other martial arts.

    That is only one use of the word. I still strike a match and I certainly don't hit it.
    Some words change their meaning according to the context in which they are used.
    I see nothing wrong with using the term strike to denote the moment when the foot comes into contact with the ground. To me this just means glancing, certainly not punch which is what a boxer does. Perhaps you should address yourself to the boxing world and ask them not to use the word 'strike'.

  • Strike insinuates to deliberately impact which is not the intention of the landing foot in running.
  • What word should we use instead of strike then?
  • If you did not strike the ground you would have to have wings
  • You still strike the ground but you mustn't deliberately strike the ground. You must do it by accident.
  • Kryten id suggest the term running. 'Front foot & toes running' technique or if you want to damage yourself 'heel running' technique. Or at times land. Eg where the foot lands on the ground as opposed to where the foot strikes the ground.
  • Isnt coffee ground?
  • image

    seek help

  • Look it's pretty simple really . You don't try to strike the ground, instead you try to miss the ground completely, but you must fail to do this thus landing on the ground unintentionally.

    Don't worry Ricky - I'll explain it to them.

  • Kryten wrote (see)

    Look it's pretty simple really . You don't try to strike the ground, instead you try to miss the ground completely, but you must fail to do this thus landing on the ground unintentionally.

    Don't worry Ricky - I'll explain it to them.

    A bit like Wily Cayote when he run's off a cliff?
  • I tells ya, if I landed on my toes, I'd not have any toes left, thats a lotta weight for my poor little tootsies to carry!!!
  • Shirley its better to never leave the ground

  • It's getting too complicated for me. I thought running was putting one foot in front of the other a bit faster than walking
«134567
Sign In or Register to comment.