Talkback: ASICS Target 26.2 Team: Colin

1568101165

Comments

  • No Speedy/Gul, I do twisting lunges in the gym with a medicine ball. Loads of those type of exercises on you tube.
  • I'm feeling inspired - think I shall wear my HR monitor at track tonight!image Hope it doesn't record a MI!
  • But why Martin? Twisting in no way replicates your movements while running, which is what you said you were doing it for. Surely you'd be better off practicing *not* twisting image
  • Is this what you do martin? (It's not you in the video is it?) image
    He makes it look so easy! Is it for stability, as I can see the benefits of that.
  • A relaxing day today taking my boys to the cinema to see the Tin Tin movie - amazing animation, nearly looks real and a great story!

    10k tonight in 45.36, average pace 7.28 and average heart rate of 157 bpm
    7.57 @ 125 bpm
    7.18 @ 157 bpm
    7.16 @ 167 bpm
    7.23 @ 163 bpm
    7.14 @ 172 bpm
    7.39 @ 160bpm

    Idea being that the first mile would be steady, the next 4 @ MP and the last mile steady. Having done easy miles for the last week or so it was the first time i have put my foot down a bit and it looks like I overcooked it on the MP section. Although it was only for 4 miles, the pace shows I have a bit of discipline to learn when it comes to MP!

  • A bit too quick but not ridiculously so - maybe you will average 7:20 at Paris but of course you can only realistically go for that pace if the shoter race peed suggests it is realistic. At this stage of the training I would think it is better to be slightly slow and feel there is more there than go too quickly but presume you felt fine ?
  • Hi Steve - When calculating a target MP do you allow anything for fade? Or is the target of your training to run the whole distance at the same speed? (7.27mins/mile?)   When I did my first marathon a couple of months ago my target was to beat 3.15 and so I set my strategy as 7.20 miles with 3 mins allowance for fade.  One of my concerns going into the race was how I would perform in the last 6 miles, when my training had stopped at 20, and I thought it was important physically and psychologically to have a bit left in reserve.   As it happens I ran most of the race nearer 7 mins miles but faded by around 5 or 6 minutes over the last quarter of the race and finished at 3.09.  How I'd have fared running at 7.20, or 7.27 pace, I'll never know!  Would be very interested in your thoughts.
  • Yes KR, that sort of exercise amongst others. It all helps to stabilise your body Speedy during the points in races where your form starts to go a bit. It stops your body rolling.

    Nice session there. I can remember from my training aimibg to run MP sections at 6.45 pace so that i had a bit in the bag for the latter stages of the race and that 6.52s would feel easy.
  • That's pretty good for a first MP run KR; after a few more, you'll get the feel for that pace and do it on auto-pilot!

  • Thanks for sharing your splits, KR. Good stuff.

    Looking back at my previous marathon training, I think I often mistakenly followed a pattern of doing a shorter 5/6 mile run too fast and then feeling a bit too tired later in the week.

    The biggest thing I've already learnt from Steve's comments this year is the importance of keeping something back, which is easier said than done.... Perhaps you could find someone who is a bit slower than you who you could run with for some of the training. I've started to try this and it definitely makes a difference. I'm sure it's linked to confidence.

    The training plan is as much a marathon rather than a sprint as much as the race itself, I guess. 

  • chs, good question about pace. I think I will be happier going at an even pace throughout even starting off more conservativelly, rather than too fast at the beginning and fading at the end.

    Gul, I hope to get the hang of the MP runs, so I can guage the pace better. Steve made a good point about holding back and feeling that there is more in the tank. I guess it a question of having a good mixture of paces in training.

    Rob, I agree with you regarding the shorter runs and not running them too fast. I am more than capable of running faster over the shorter distances, but locking into the pace that you have to run 26.2 miles is another thing. I'm hoping to get better at the MP over the coming weeks! image

  • Looking at doing the Gunnersbury Parkrun, South Ealing in the morning - is that a local one for anyone? If so, what's the course like - any good? Say hello if you are there! image
  • MinniMinni ✭✭✭

    KR you've got off to a great start with some great running.  How does the weekly mileage compare to other campaigns?

  • Thanks Minni, only had the first 4 weeks of the plan so far, but I think the general weekly mileage is probably a bit lower than what I have done previously. In other campaigns I have averaged 50 -55  miles per week with a peak of nearly 60 on one week. This was partly down to a 12 - 14 midweek run. But I think getting a particular weekly mileage is less important than getting the right kind of miles. I like the look of what is in the plan so far with a good mix of faster miles an slower miles.
  • CHS

    to run 3:15 is 7:26.5 per mile so I would say the best thing is probably going to be to target a 3:11/3:12 time - (to give yourself something in hand - and go through halfway in 1:36 but presuming shorter race distances suggest this is likely and so if it is by mid to late February and everything looks on course with solid long runs and previous marathon paced runs feeling good then  it is worth bringing those marathon pace runs around 7:17-7:20 but I still think it is best to start conservatively on the marathon paced training runs and start with a 7:30 and then gradually pick up to 7:20 rather than start with a 7:10 and then slow down. Also for now target marathon pace can be 7:25 and you only up it once you have some good training behind you.

  • Great start on the training (and forum to that end) KR. Well done.
    Best of luck going into 2012.

    I'm two weeks into "official" training for Brighton now and all going to plan so far as well.
  • Thanks Steve. That's very helpful.  I guess that a few of us target 3.15 (or whatever is applicable) as GFA times but in reality we're capable of doing better than that once we've got the training in.  I'm sure KR will be fitting into that category image.

    I didn't plan to run faster than 7.20 mins miles in my marathon but just found that happening on the day with the excitement, adrenalin and race conditions.   I knew that the faster pace could have been disastrous and kept telling myself to slow down in the initial miles...  However, I was feeling comfortable and after about 4 to 5 miles just decided to go with it.   I probably slowed down more than I needed in the last few miles because I was confident I had met the objective of 3.15 and didn't want to blow up in the last 6 miles, which were an unknown quantity for me.  At that stage it was very reassuring to know that I had spare time in the tank and could take it relatively easy through to the finish.  In fact I remember thinking at mile 21 that it was just a 5 mile recovery run to the finish.  Psychologically that was a great help. 

  • chs wrote (see)
    Hi Steve - When calculating a target MP do you allow anything for fade? Or is the target of your training to run the whole distance at the same speed? (7.27mins/mile?)   When I did my first marathon a couple of months ago my target was to beat 3.15 and so I set my strategy as 7.20 miles with 3 mins allowance for fade.  One of my concerns going into the race was how I would perform in the last 6 miles, when my training had stopped at 20, and I thought it was important physically and psychologically to have a bit left in reserve.   As it happens I ran most of the race nearer 7 mins miles but faded by around 5 or 6 minutes over the last quarter of the race and finished at 3.09.  How I'd have fared running at 7.20, or 7.27 pace, I'll never know!  Would be very interested in your thoughts.

    CHS, I had much the same questions and dilemma this year, got to 20 miles and knew I would hit all my targets, and just kept on padding on with more of an eye to holding onto what I had rather than gamble for more. This year I am putting in more endurance work and hoping that at the same point I feel strong enough to take on that last 10k rather than sit back and let it roll in.

    I had a sneaky peak at your parkrun record and 157 completed parkruns is a hell of a record, though as each is only less than an eighth of the marathon distance I am not sure that one each and every Saturday is the best preparation. Do you pad the parkrun out with distance before and or afterwards? When it comes to marathon time I sometimes run from home or run home after and that adds 13 to the 3 of the parkrun.

  • PMJ - Impressive research!  No I don't pad the parkruns out.  My daughter usually runs with me, so we're in the car.    I trained relatively intensively for 10 weeks prior to my first marathon, averaging about 50 miles per week, with a peak mileage of 65.  Think that was the key and discovering LSR's for the first time.   Am hoping to go a little quicker at VLM this year and suspect I need to increase the weekly mileage further and incorporate more speedwork.  Only issue is the time commitment...
  • KR - interesting to see that your weekly and total mileage is going to prob be less than you've done for previous campaigns. I suppose that's what I was hinting at when I asked you what your mileage had been in the base building weeks. Looks like you're going to be someone who maybe miles and more miles isn't the key to good performance - I'm sure this different strategy is going to give you big rewards

    chs - Research is PMJ's middle name - 

  • chs wrote (see)
    PMJ - Impressive research!  No I don't pad the parkruns out.  My daughter usually runs with me, so we're in the car.    I trained relatively intensively for 10 weeks prior to my first marathon, averaging about 50 miles per week, with a peak mileage of 65.  Think that was the key and discovering LSR's for the first time.   Am hoping to go a little quicker at VLM this year and suspect I need to increase the weekly mileage further and incorporate more speedwork.  Only issue is the time commitment...

    10 weeks is a pretty short campaign especially if you taper properly (three week taper leaves seven weeks build up) so if you are already thinking (and training for) VLM then you have addressed that issue.

    In terms of mileage, I don't think much more is needed. I did 795 miles in a16 week campaign (average just under 50) with a maximum of about 63. If you factor in the taper the average was 53 weeks in the first 13 weeks. The key is ensurign that the hard sessions are focussed and the recovery sessions are recovery.

  • Fraser Wells wrote (see)
    chs - Research is PMJ's middle name - 
    No it's not, it's... (am I allowed to say?) Well, it begins with an M anyway image
  • knight rider wrote (see)
    Looking at doing the Gunnersbury Parkrun, South Ealing in the morning - is that a local one for anyone? If so, what's the course like - any good? Say hello if you are there! image
    Looks like you didn't need much help with course pointers: just looked at the results as DanA off the sub 3:00 thread came home first and saw another familiar name near the top: well done!
  • PMJ - Yes, I included a 3 week taper which I'm sure also contributed to running faster on the day than I had planned.   Thanks re other comments: In terms of mileage, I don't think much more is needed.  The key is ensurign that the hard sessions are focussed and the recovery sessions are recovery.  You're probably right.  I suspect I need to do more hard sessions and slow down the recoveries.   Think my recovery runs should be at around 8mins mile pace but a lot of the time they seem to drift to an average of 7.40/45.   Need to concentrate more on these!   
  • chs, my recovery runs are at 8m30s or slower so I suspect you're running your general runs too quickly. The best success I got in marathons was when I slowed my running right down and made my long run pace MP + 60-75 secs so around 8-30s pace.

    Well done on the Parkrun today KR, good marker so early on
  • Excellent Parkrun time KR. 

    Happy New Year all image

  • Cheeky park run today at Gunnersbury park, managed 3rd place in a time of 19.11, which works out at 6.08 pace I think, so not too bad a pace for this time of year. Should have been a bit quicker as the marshals sent me the wrong way after the 2nd lap. I was following the guy in front, but he didn't hear the marshals shouting to go the other way. Luckily I heard them and managed to double back. Think it probably added up to 8-10 seconds to my time. Good route though and only their 10th run.
    Happy new year everyone, have a good night!
  • Well done KR - very good run and well done on the third place  might have been a sub-19 but for the directional problem. Shows the speed is there already.

    See Pete T won Poole today in 16:28 about a minute up on Liz E so he's finishing year really well.

    Agree with CHS assessment - just ease back the recovery runs a bit and then you should be sharper and fresher for the more i9mportant runs.

  • Thanks for the advice Steve and Matchstick Man.  My wife calls me Chicken Licken when I have my running tights on!   Always thought that was a bit harsh but perhaps I should make that my new handle!

    Probably training too hard today and tomorrow...  Did a parkrun this am (20.12), it was quite wet and slippery around our course so a bit slower than recently, then a 5 mile club run this pm (32.43) and am planning to do 3 parkruns tomorrow, if logistics allow me to get to each of them!   Will definitely need a slower recovery run after that lot!

    Happy New Year all and best of luck with all your running targets in 2012, especially you KR!

  • Happy New Year everyone
1568101165
Sign In or Register to comment.