On One Pompino

Hello all, I'm looking to get a fixie and I like the look of the On One Pompino. If any of you have one and would like to sell it could you pm me please. I need a medium.

Ta!
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Comments

  • I used to have one. It was great but I wouldn't buy it again. The brakes hacked me off and there are loads of cheaper options available.
  • Such as?
  • Jam Bikes have some cheap and cheerful bikes. For something a bit more mainstream, Evans have a selection of decent fixies including the Spec Langster.

    I'd go for flat bars.
  • null

    or get an old steel framed racer with horizontal drop outs and make your own
  • Petal has a Spec Langster - frame bought from a certain person just above me... image mine is an old alu frame of mine with standard dropouts but I use a Surly chain tensioner to keep the chain tight. flat bars and BMX brakes

    madlot - don't get hooked on the Pompino - as Mr W says, there are loads of other equally good, if not better (but perhaps more pricey), ones around. check out the London Fixie & SS site for loads of info on bikes, builds, parts, classifieds etc. it's an excellent site for info.
  • fat buddha wrote (see)
    Petal has a Spec Langster - frame bought from a certain person just above me... image mine is an old alu frame of mine with standard dropouts but I use a Surly chain tensioner to keep the chain tight. flat bars and BMX brakes madlot - don't get hooked on the Pompino - as Mr W says, there are loads of other equally good, if not better (but perhaps more pricey), ones around. check out the London Fixie & SS site for loads of info on bikes, builds, parts, classifieds etc. it's an excellent site for info.
    I have toyed with the idea of converting an old racer but struggled to find one with a horizontal axis now that fixies are all the rage... is it just as easy to use standards and a chain tensioner?
  • "is it just as easy to use standards and a chain tensioner?"

    yep - dead easy. there's plenty of info and videos on t'web of how to convert a standard setup to a single speed - Charlie the Bikemonger is a good place to start with his "how to" video - he sells all you need for the conversion. I used him when I converted my old frame into a SS.

    if you want to splash out though you can get the rear wheel built with a White Industries ENO Eccentric Rear Hub which avoids the need for a chain tensioner.
  • Very tempting (the chain tensioner method. not the expensive hub) - could be a spring project as I would rather like to convert my 2nd bike that I use away frmo home rather than just selling it when I leave here. Cheers
  • it's a good project imho - you can source a lot of stuff 2nd hand to keep the costs down if you need.
  • I have a pompino, I bought it from someone on here. I really like it, although to be fair, its the only fixie I've ever owned, and the only other fixed gears I've ridden are track bikes. But I would agree that the make/model is probably not the important thing.
  • That would be the plan - new wheels and hub and then just second hand everything else... would go for bull horn bars I think as well. What's the consensus with brakes... front and back?
  • I would, if its for road riding. From a safety point of view.
  • That's what I was thinking, would be for riding around London so probably wise. Thanks

    Sorry for the post hijack! image

  • GB - I have front and back brakes on my SS (as do most SS users). for a fixie, many would say you only need a front but that's assuming you know what you're doing with the rear!!!

    you don't need a new hub if you have a spare standard road wheel - just take the old cassette off and use spacers and a single ring in their place
  • Fair enough that's easy enough... so all I would need theoretically to do it now would be the chain tensioner? How difficult are these to fit?

    If that is the case I would be tempted to do it sooner rather than later so that I can get some winter commuting on it

  • actually on second thoughts it is also what I am doing all of my weekday turbo training on, and I have broken the resistance on the trainer so probably not a good idea to change it just yet. May wait until it starts getting lighter outdoors and then I suppose it wont matter as much as I will replace the 2 x turbo's per week with outdoor fixie riding
  • You can run a singlespeed free hub with a chain tensioner. but not a fixed. Also even with a fixed i now run front and back brakes just had a front until a van pulled out on me on a steep downhill the skid and stop was awesome but i nearly ripped my legs off image no back brake may be fine on the flat or pootling around but for everyday riding one day you will need it
  • I have a couple now a Surley Steamroller kitted with full mudguards as my commute bike its a billiant bombproof workhorse and a nice Ribble 531 steel framed speed machine i built up from an abandoned wreck for around £120 its a real flyer .....i love my fixies and tend to ride them more than anything else
  • chain tenioners are easy to fit - they connect to the rear hanger just like the rear derailleur does - in fact it replaces it.

    tbh - leave the current frame as it is and get a 2nd hand one and build it up. you'll have more fun doing that (plus learn some more about bike mechanics) and it gives you another bike to faff around on... image

    that way you can ditch all the mechs, intergrated levers, and have a purpose built bike which is also good for the winter commute as less cleaning is needed!
  • The bike I was going to change is only my 2nd (soon to be 3rd bike) bike and was only about £170 about 10 months ago... i use it for training in the week as I work away in Edinburgh on weekdays.

    Hopefully I will be working in London again in 4/5 months so will probably just wait until then and I can convert this to a fixie and use my main bike to train on in the week. Doesnt really make sense spending more money on another naff bike to convert and then having to sell this one when I finish working here.

    Oh the joys of working away image

  • http://www.evanscycles.com/products/trek/2nd-district-single-speed-road-bike-ec020771

    What about one of those - colour is a bit love it or hate it maybe (I like it myself) but it's got mudguard eyes and a chainguard is useful on a fixed which you are using to knock about on as you don't need to wear lycra or worry about your trousers or shoe laces getting ripped to shreds if they are caught in the chain.
  • I run a Spesh Tricross singlespeed. Heavy-ish ally frame, fat 32 tyres with knobbles, extra brake levers on the bars, shallow drops, 42/18. Great hack, pretty cheap (£275 new), flip flop hub but fixie scares me shitless and smashes me bollox when I pull away so use SS now.

    Only real problem is awful toeslap. Apart from that it's a blast and I can do no handed again like a nine year old. Hooray!
  • I still want a pompino image
  • or a road rat, if i could find a 2nd hand one of them, i'd be chuffed!
  • have seen a pearson hanzo though that looks quite nice and we all know its the looks that count image
  • I've had a Pearson Touche for around 5 years now and it's great, but the new ones have got a bit pricey compared with some of the alternatives.  Halo fluorescent yellow wheels and a green chain - it is looks that count.
  • Condr make a lovely steel fixed but ££££££££££image
  •  my mate got anew charge plug racer for around £350 loks the biz but is a bit on the heavy side
  • singlespeed ??? I still don't get it....... gears were invented for a reason  image

    anyway, I (almost)  have a shiny new  bike to work voucher in my hand - time for a new commute steed - I think an alfine hubbed cyclocross with mud guard mounts......  oh look, theres one from genesis - and its orange!!! - SOLD!

  • I think the Giant Bowery 72 2011 is a great looking singlespeed. Good value here if you are little:

    http://www.tritoncycles.co.uk/m14b252s180p8294/GIANT_Bowery_72_2011/RS_GB/22189
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