Barefoot running ... genius or stupid?

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Comments

  • DeanR7DeanR7 ✭✭✭
    is it possible a reason the barefoot converts like it so much is because it advocates training in a correct manner.  For example start with very small mileage, and build up slowly.  Also the average pace is probably slower.  Of course injuries would be less likely under these conditions. but because barefoot needs you to think correctly you are more "bought" into this training process than perhaps if you bought a pair of cushioned traininers.
  • Ian - a few points on the right/wrong thing:

    1) Who's to say there's one right/wrong way for all people, perhaps different things are right for different people?

    2) There's a basic assumption that POSE/chi/another forefoot strike method is right/good form - my question is what that is based on?

  • Ian Knowles wrote (see)

    AnneV had it exactly right in my opinion. There is such a thing as good and bad running form. Why is that so hard to believe? Why would running be the only sport where no-one needed to learn good technique and just did 'what feels right'?

    I'm just not sure about this. Why shouldn't we do what feels right? we all learnt to walk by doing this, all ran around as children by doing what felt natural and other animals manage to run by doing what comes naturally to them rather than learning good form. As for other sports, they're somewhat different -  they use other impliments such as rackets, bats and balls or have specific ways of doing them, such as high jump.
  • Dr.DanDr.Dan ✭✭✭
    Catalin Bond wrote (see)
    I'm just not sure about this. Why shouldn't we do what feels right? we all learnt to walk by doing this, all ran around as children by doing what felt natural and other animals manage to run by doing what comes naturally to them rather than learning good form. As for other sports, they're somewhat different -  they use other impliments such as rackets, bats and balls or have specific ways of doing them, such as high jump.

    Barefootist evangelists will tell you that the evil chunky trainers have taught us to run with bad form ... and by becoming more natural we will automatically beging to readopt correct form. There's some truth in this - my form improved when I spent 6 months in VFFs. However, there are alternative ways to improve form and run more safely that don't involve throwing your shoes away.

  • Catalin Bond wrote (see
    )
    Why shouldn't we do what feels right? we all learnt to walk by doing this, all ran around as children by doing what felt natural and other animals manage to run by doing what comes naturally to them rather than learning good form.


    Other animals don't wear shoes, or spend their days sitting at a computer, or do any other things that affect their natural posture and biomechanics. They learn to run when young, and they never stop. Nature is tough, and if they don't learn to run correctly they won't last long.

    If you watch children running around, they generally have amazing natural form. I watched a mum and daughter finish Park Run recently: mum looked terrible - landing on her heels, limbs flailing all over the place. Her daughter, aged maybe 9 or 10, looked wonderful skipping along next to her, landing nimbly on her toes with a smooth, easy style.

    If the little girl keeps on running into her adult life, hopefully she'll retain that great form. I think the danger comes when we stop running then take up the sport again in later life. In between, all kinds of factors have changed us, and we may have 'forgotten' how to run correctly.

  • I've been running for 3 or 4 years now, and am a die hard chunky shoe wearer, i like the way they feel, i like the style and don't plan on changing to anything else. 

    I think that, if you are tempted by the whole bear foot thing, then go for it, give it a try, if it's that good then you have nothing to lose.

    I'm happy with my running style, i'm a heel planter, and to be perfectly honest, i've had plenty of injury's and pains, but nothing that has ever stopped me running. 

    Perhaps this is naive of me, but surley the manufactures have spent countless amounts on research of there shoe ranges, and have the large heels for good reason. at the end of the day, the cost of the likes of the VFF's and normal type running shoes are pretty much the same to the consumer, but i would imagine a lot cheaper for the manufacture to produce, and then keep higher profits. 

  • Super Gibo wrote (see)

    Perhaps this is naive of me, but surley the manufactures have spent countless amounts on research of there shoe ranges, and have the large heels for good reason. at the end of the day, the cost of the likes of the VFF's and normal type running shoes are pretty much the same to the consumer, but i would imagine a lot cheaper for the manufacture to produce, and then keep higher profits. 

    Are you saying it's cheaper for companies to make trailgloves or VFFs compared to Nike Air's (for example)???  Pretty sure that won't be true.  I find it's best to think about whatever is on your foot when running as footwear for running (not how much material is in it) and base my assessment on price vs how I run in them.  So for example I am a minimalist footwear runner and have a pair of luna sandals and when they first arrived in the post I though WTF have I bought, but actually now in terms of value for money for how well I run in them it's worth it - much better than if I bought some big heeled Nikes or similar.  (plus Nike will have huge economies of scale, and in answer to the research I'm not sure that's true and quite well documented in Nike's case).

    I always look on it as what works for one person might not for another - so diets, footwear, training regimes etc so I'm now a front foot striker and it works for me in minimalist shoes but if heel planting works for you then good luck.

  • I see what your saying, and Like i said, Naive image

    Most of the post on this thread seem to be pointing at Nike as a big offender with the fashion in large cushioned heels, but don't the likes of Asic's, New Blance, Brookes and alike all have similar designs?

    I'm sure they must do some research in to what makes a good running or sports shoe. I use Asic's, and love them.

     

  • MY New Balance Minimuses are rather on the dear side, £70.00 for a very thin sole and sides. They are just like a glove for your foot but in the modern world I would rather pay that than stumble upon debris that could damage my foot or worse step in something rather smelly. All today is about money, everything revolves round it unfortunately and it will for ever after so no surprise shoe companies want their share. I am a barefoot runner now, most my runs are now done in 0mm shoes and some in 3mm differential, I used to have so many injuries and now I have been able to run half a year with absolutely nothing. I am all for it but it does mean a lot of hard work to get technique right.

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