Ruuner dies at Reading Half

Really upsetting news that someone has died finishing the Reading Half marathon today. Thoughts are with his family. No details to exact cause, but he was only 30 years old too - very sad!

Comments

  • Yes very sad KR. On the same day we fInd out about the death of Caballo Blanco of Born to Run fame too. RIP to both of them.
  • TimeaJTimeaJ ✭✭✭
    A shadow on such a glorious day!  I find it shocking that people (most recently, another football player as well) with no obvious underlying issues can just die like that.
  • Ged Clarke, the runner who died at Reading was a former colleague of mine and we ran at lunctimes together with a bunch of others for over 5 years. He was one of the founders of our work running club.

    We did many races together including adventure races, hashes and the usual 10k and halves.

    He was a great guy; I hadn't seen him for over a year as I have left that Company but still kept in touch by emails

    He encouraged others to run at lunch time using the twitter account @12pmclub.

    He was fit as a fiddle and whilst it is of scant consolation he died doing what he loved doing.

    My thoughts are with his family and I will never prevaricate again, life is just too short.

    I went for a run in the sun at lunchtime today on my own through the local countryside and my thoughts were of him and the great times we had together with friends and colleagues.

     So sad

    Piers

  • It would consolate me if I died doing something I loved. If there was a queue to die making love or a queue to die being run over then I would be in that long motherf....
  • SR,

    Too true, though I was really thinking of consolation to the family.

    Some days life is just too unfair.

    Piers 

  • Deepest sympathy for his family.  Without knowing what he actually dies of, but taking a guess that it will be some kind of undiagnosed heart problem, there is something we can all do to lessen our chances of the same and that would be to wear a heart monitor.  Though it is not going to make a jot of difference to any problem you have it could help in giving you enough information to go and see a doctor. 
  • @SR(NLR) - dying doing something you loved would be no consolation to you - you'd be dead.

    @JF50 - how would wearing a heart monitor lessen our chances of falling victim to an undiagnosed heart problem?
  • Well in my scenario I am in a queue to die so therefore I am aware of my fate and am consolated while I wait in it. My fantasy my rules

    @Intermanaut@JF50-spot on. We are mortal. Let's accept it. 16000 people run Reading year in year out. Chances were soemone would die one day. People die at the theatre, watching football etc etc
  • Intermanaut, wearing a HRM doesn't stop you falling victim to anything but it does give you some useful information and so issues that might be exercise induced can be seen early.  For most people the behaviour of your heart sticks to a pattern when you exercise so you might be able to spot problems, not all of  which cause any pain.  I'm not saying it's going to save anybody but it might help.
  • In any walks of life its sad to hear of someone passing away for all the persons family and friends , i can only pass on my condolances.

    SR yes we are in that queue that the inevitable is going to happen and you dont know when but you have to show abit of compassion what if it was someone close to you in your family , would you just shrug your shoulders and pass off your views then.

  • JB74 wrote (see)

    SR yes we are in that queue that the inevitable is going to happen and you dont know when but you have to show abit of compassion what if it was someone close to you in your family , would you just shrug your shoulders and pass off your views then.


    I can't raise much compassion for a total stranger, someone I had never even heard of, let alone met?

    Yes, it's sad for their family and friends, but it doesn't mean anything to most people.  And they are dead, and not in need of anything from a bunch of strangers.

  • Quite heartless really may have been a stranger but was a human being.

    Why do people give money to charities like cancer etc you dont know alot of the people but you wouldnt want it to be you.

    Also when you see people dying in other countries you thankful it isnt you , same as you can be thankful everytime you come over the finish line and you complete run that you go home alive.

    quite heartless of you really, yes you dont know the person or the persons family but you have to have a thought that it wasnt you, or are you not bothered if you die tomorrow .

  • If I die tomorrow, then so be it.

    I'm quite enjoying life, but if that where to happen I wouldn't know much about it anyway.  I don't fear death.

    People give money to charities for many different reasons: because a particular charity has helped them, or someone they love, in the past and they want to give something back, or cancer charities are looking for a cure, and people feel they might need one one day.

  • Lets hope all those who don't have much of a caring thought on here, stay happy and healthy & they never have to cry for the loss of a loved one who dies. The person who dies of course doesn't know. Its the people who loved them dearly that are heart broken and strangers can be sad too. Very sad...

    The Good Samaritan comes to mind....

  • I don't see the connection between crying for the loss of someone you love, and not feeling moved by the death of a total stranger.

    The good samaritan helped someone who was in need of practical help, which is not the same as feeling sad that someone you've never met has died (and is far more valuable).

  • Its more the feeling that its not you who collapsed and your loved ones and if you have kids still have you in there life not just the memory.

    If you look at life like you do as if you die tomorrow so be it, but with most who love life and possibly like that person would have like to seen there kids grow up then you have to a spare a thought to the family and thought that thankfully your still breathing and loving life and next time you go out to run that you return home.

  • The Bad Samaritan then. Theres people who 'will' help and  DO care for strangers and then theres people who will walk right past and don't give a stuff....I'm glad, there are people in this world who feel something  for others.

    I didn't say cry over a stranger but no concern of the sufferings of others is another thing !!!

    Lets leave it there ....

  • I think everyone has lost someone at sometime. It's not a grief competition Pixielong.... The Good Samaritan chappie was there at the time. If he was at the Race I'm sure he would have helped but there wouldn't be much he could have done reading about it on an internet forum a few days later.
  • Lets there it there? I think that's for everyone to decide.
  • PiXieLoNgStOcKiNg wrote (see)

    The Bad Samaritan then. Theres people who 'will' help and  DO care for strangers and then theres people who will walk right past and don't give a stuff

    That's my point - helping someone who needs help, caring for a stranger when you can actually do something useful, is valuable.

    Expressing sadness at the death of a stranger is no use to anyone, won't make anything better, and the family of the deceased won't know about it anyway.

    I'm not saying don't do it if that's how you feel, and it makes you feel better. We're all different.

  • I thought that we, as society as a whole, are supposed to grieve for everything and everyone, which is why you see bunches of dead litter at the road-side.
  • I grieve for everyone in proportion. A complete stranger gets a "oh dear how sad" I think that's completely normal
  • "People give money to charities for many different reasons: because a particular charity has helped them, or someone they love, in the past and they want to give something back, or cancer charities are looking for a cure, and people feel they might need one one day."

    Sorry, I don't get this Wilkie. Lots of people give to charities for many other reasons - and they are often a lot less selfish than the reasons you have listed.
  • I think Wilkie implied that people give charities for other reasons when she said "people give to charities for many different reasons". In fact she didn't imply it. She said it.
  • Jeremy Chapman 3 wrote (see)
    "People give money to charities for many different reasons: because a particular charity has helped them, or someone they love, in the past and they want to give something back, or cancer charities are looking for a cure, and people feel they might need one one day." Sorry, I don't get this Wilkie. Lots of people give to charities for many other reasons - and they are often a lot less selfish than the reasons you have listed.

    As you have quoted me correctly, you'll have noticed that I said  "People give money to charities for many different reasons", which strongly suggests more than two.

    It's not meant to be an exhaustive list, just a couple of examples of less altruistic reasons that people give to charity. 

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