Chip timing?

Hi everyone!

I'm taking part in the Shock absorber women only run 10K at Richmond park in October (my first ever 10k race) and have started training for this. When I registered and entered the race online, the Organiser's said that I will be sent a timing chip for this. I may sound silly but, what are they and how do they work?

I only ask this as I'm not familiar with this sort of thing image.

 

Comments

  • Usually worn on a strap round your ankle or sometimes they are now stuck to your race number
    You will cross a mat at the start and finish of the event and sometimes a midway point which will register your chip time and gun time

  • Sian - it means that in larger races people will have a 'real' time registered no matter how long they have to wait to cross the start line. The gun time is from when the gun goes off and includes the time to cross the start, a chip time is from the point you actually cross the start line and is calculated electronically. In very big races that can be very significant difference. It means you don't have everyone trying to start as far near the front as they can as it makes no difference in the end, or at least that is the theory!



    Good luck!
  • If the chip is the kind that you wear on a Velcro strap round your ankle, or attach to the laces of your shoes, you have to remember to give it back at the end (there are generally pretty obvious people at the finish collecting them), or generally you'll be charged a fee (usually about ??10). If it's the kind that's attached to your number they're disposable. Don't worry, it will all be explained in the pre-race info.
  • Er, that should be ten pounds. Weirdness on the phone/RW interface.
  • The gun time is from when the gun goes off and includes the time to cross the start, a chip time is from the point you actually cross the start line

    http://www.avufo.info/g.gif

     

  • Is being quoted by by a spam weirdo the ultimate accolade?
  • Dont assume that because chips are being issued that there will be 'chip times'.

    They are often used as a more efficient way of recording gun times.

  • Oh, I didn't know that.  I don't think I've ever had a chip where that's the case, but maybe I have and I'm actually faster than I believe.  Then again, probably not!

  • Many thanks for all the advice from you all. I now understand this Chip timing thing and I'll keep on training hard and smart! image

Sign In or Register to comment.