Running with a Dog

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Comments

  • KK, the colour. They are separate breeds, The Swiss shepherds are all pure white, white is a banned colour under the German Shepherd breed standard. For many years the Whites were discounted in Germany as mongrels even though they have been bred in a pure line for many generations. But now they are officially recognised by the FCI and classified in the "pastoral", i.e. herding class. The Swiss shepherds are in general softer in temperament than the DSH and thus make great family pets. But most are very good at learning - at 4 months Charly already does the sit, down, come, commands.

  • KK, my chocolate lab has problems with his front paws and he gets sore pads. I have a pair of boots for him when they are sore so he can still come out on walks but doesn't make them worse. They do get a few looks but he gets on fine with them. And huskys wear them when they do long distances sled pulling.



    The ones I got are these:

    http://www.innerwolf.co.uk/dog-boots/ruffwear-bark-n-boots-grip-trex-2-set.html



    I have tried a number of different dog boots over the years and these ones are by far the easiest to put on and adjust that I have found. I would recommend the socks that you can get for use with them as when running they can rub the dew claw area. He has come running with me in them and had no problems with them coming off. He generally stays home if I run though as he gets fed up after a while and will sit down and look in the direction of home til I get the hint. Lol.
  • Shani used to have problems in the snow with ice building up between her pads. I got her some of the booties that our husky-racing friend uses, they are bright orange with velcro fastenings, work very well and look very fetching too.

  • Dogs with boots on! I love it!

  • Bionic Ironwolf, Oz and Shani, lovely names.. sorry they've passed on. Nemo & Charly are gorgeous, I've a soft spot for black sheps.. a white wouldn't be that colour for long where I live!

    As for the ice building up in their pads, dogs can be prone to this if they have hairy pads, or sometimes it's the distance between the pads themselves. Salt on roads can make it worse too, so good to rinse & dry paws afterwards. You can trim the fur between if they're not too ticklish. 

    RB, those boots look good image

  • kittenkat wrote (see)

    Iw, what's the difference between a swiss and german shepherd?

    I was expecting a joke!!

  • An Englishman, an Irishman a swiss and german shepherd walk into a bar.........

  • I always run with my dog - a German shorthaired pointer - gorgeous breed and fab running partner who will go at any pace you choose. (Although he will drink half my water bottle!) we have trained for a half marathon and now started for VLM although I probably will drop him off home halfway through as my long runs start getting longer!! Only problem is everyone always wants to say hello!
  • RedjeepRedjeep ✭✭✭

    I was a bit shocked today to find that after our 10 mile run yesterday, my dog has a patch of missing fur along his chest where the harness had been resting. It doesn't seem to bother him, but he keeps licking it.

    I don't think I'll run him again until I buy him a new harness. By the way, there's a very good article in Trail Running magazine this week about running with dogs.

  • I take Buckley the beagle-lab mix on short recovery runs (less than 2 miles at a gentle pace). He loves it, though he does suddenly sprint without warning.

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  • Vizla / Weimaraner seem to make good distance running dogs.  Mine is a German Shepherd / Husky / Retriever cross and he is a bit too big and heavy for my normal 6min km pace, he starts eating grass and throwing up at about 10k.   Also cannot resist a squirrel so has to be on a lead for running because he can and does catch them, deadly clever rather than fast.  I use him for when I should be taking it easy, we can go and pootle for a couple of hours.

  • My dog (a Newfoundland) is useless at running BUT should be good at Swimming but most of the time wont go deeper than his chest!

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  • RedjeepRedjeep ✭✭✭
    Barry Lee 4 wrote (see)

    I take Buckley the beagle-lab mix on short recovery runs (less than 2 miles at a gentle pace). He loves it, though he does suddenly sprint without warning.

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    Barry - what sort of harness is that ? Are you (and Buckley) happy with it ? Does anybody else have any recomendations ?

  • Redjeep - it is a Trixie fleece lined harness. It is padded and seems really comfortable on him. We only moved to it from a normal nylon one because when he was a wriggling/kicking little pup, we couldn't get it on! Go to Pet Planet online - really good deals and far more selection than Pets at Home.

  • I have a choccie lab would run and swim all day if I let her.
  • RedjeepRedjeep ✭✭✭

    Thanks Barry. I'll take a look at them.

  • I have two cocker spaniels who run with me every time I go.  I'm currently running up to 8-9 miles and they happily do this (although I'm running at about 9 min miles).  This amount of running does not exhaust them, they will still go mad round the garden when we get back!

    I do run with them on leads, but they are not allowed to pull - they have to run to heel.  Yes, having them on lead does mean that I have to allow them the odd wee stop - but they aren't allowed to just stop whenever, its when I say so.

    Mine are nearly 6 years and 2.5 years old and both have run regularly with me for over a year.  They are also brilliant family pets.  I will point out that they are Working Cocker Spaniels, not the show type, therefore they are bred to run all day flushing out game birds.

    With any breed of dog, you need to do your research.  If it is going to be a family pet, then temperment has to be your first priority, does it require alot of grooming? (my spaniels need a fair bit).  With any breed, you need to spend the time training them (my youngest has not had enough training, hence can't be allowed off lead in open areas - my fault, not his) and the whole family need to agree on what is and isn't acceptable behaviour. Find a puppy obediance class and take them as soon as you possibly can.

     

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     Here's a pic of my boys taken a few weeks ago image

     

  • Endorsed wholeheartedly - I'm a firm believer in proper training classes for all breeds of dog. They are pack animals and happiest when they know the family hierarchy and where they rank. This is promoted during training to obey simple commands - you may find both your dog and you start to really enjoy working. And they learn that YOU are the pack alpha who is to be obeyed.

  • Border Terrier owner here. My lad will easily run 20+ miles up hill and down dale and still want to go out later for another mooch!

    They were originally bred to run with foxhounds and have immense stamina despite their little legs. Mine can happily keep up at 6:30 min/miling but he's happier off the lead at that pace than on it. 

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  • Hi

    Working Cocker Spaniels, love to run mine is 4 and enjoys about a 4 mile run best at a good pace but on a slower run goes much further. But he'd do this every day even in the snow!

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  • Springer spaniels !!!! I run with my sisters and she can do 10 miles no problem and then wants to go out again when we get back , one problem if she smells a rabbit she can disappear so has to go on lead near rabbit holes or i can spend a while looking for her but she loves to go out and goes wild when she sees the running shoes go on .

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