Inappropriate language

I was cooking for some friends of my younger daughter. One said, "Hey, this pizza's really lush!"

Oh I'm terribly sorry, I'll take it away then.
My garden is lush. With all this rain the lawn is really overgrown.

Obviously I am aware that language does change, but not on my watch. It isn't like I was going to ask them if they had a gay time at the children's party.

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Comments

  • I think someone needs to take some chillout pills

  • sound like an old man blisters..........unless you walk around talking in shakespherean language then you have no reason to moan at the evolution of the language.....you are just as guiltyimage

  • Pizza ?? You allow modern food into the house ???
  • When I read the title of the thread, this is not the content I expected!

    "Lush" is a great word. Maybe Gavin & Stacey  (a popular BBC situation-comedy television series, broadcast in the noughties* ) helped popularise it.

     

    * Is "noughties" allowed?

  • Perhaps it was used as an abbreviation of LUSCIOUS?

  • Or luxurious?

  • Lush has been used in that context for years in Bristol and the South West.  Since long before Gavin and Stacey.

    Gert Lush makes it even better.

     

  • Mouse I concur

    Gert Lush that's very common

     I come from Surrey where we speak proper though ;-)

    Another one from down here. Instead of saying 'Where is it' They say 'Wheres it to?' That really grates on me lol I always find the need to correct them image

  • Now for me Lush is a person usually an older woman who has a bit of a drink problem!
  • M..o.use wrote (see)

    Lush has been used in that context for years in Bristol and the South West.  Since long before Gavin and Stacey.

    Gert Lush makes it even better.  

    Mr plodder is from Bristol and has been calling my cooking "Gert Lush" for years image

  • I'm sure we said this at school waaay back in the seventies. image

    What is beginning to annoy me... and I am afraid I am also guilty of it, is that terrible inflection at the end of sentences? Makes everything you say sound like a question even when it's not? Or maybe makes you sound a bit Australian? 

    image

     

  • The rising inflection really annoys me. It's completely unnecessary? And very irritating? Why are all Australians so quizzical?

    Something I've noticed since moving up north is people saying, for example, '12 while 3' meaning from 12pm until 3pm. While? I don't understand!

  • The AQI (Australian Quesioning Intonation) has been a linguistic marker used to track language development for the last 20 odd years (I know, cos I wrote an essay on it once image)
    The other linguistic oddity that was mapped in the same way was the "non-prevocalic r" - the over pronunciation of an r in words (a bit like what we might think of as the English South West burr) that was perceived to be more prevalent in the upper-middle classes in 1950s America, so it was forcibly adopted into aspirant working class accents.

    There is also a feminist paper that argues that the AQI has increased in frequency as women have become more powerful and successful as it is a "femine" softening of a statement - make it seem like you are asking a question/seem unsure, when in fact you are giving a straight instruction, for example. Don't know how much I subscribe to that idea.

  • Through.

    They say 12 through 3 here.

    I am NOT American.

    I checked image

  • Australians probably developed that 'questioning intonation' as a result of so many of them having ascended from the criminal classes. Having been apprehended by the law; again, the response was in answer to a typical leading question, eg." Afternoon Bruce, why do you think I arrested you this time?", "er, because you think I stole these sheep?". image

  • To me Lush is a shop selling fancy and very heavily fragranced cosmetics. Spend five minutes in the place and you come out smelling like a whore's handbag.

  • RicF wrote (see)

    Australians probably developed that 'questioning intonation' as a result of so many of them having ascended from the criminal classes. Having been apprehended by the law; again, the response was in answer to a typical leading question, eg." Afternoon Bruce, why do you think I arrested you this time?", "er, because you think I stole these sheep?". image

    If a copper should happen across someone with sheep in the Outback the conversation will probably go more like:

    "G'day Bruce, you shearing?"
    "No mate, I'm keeping these little beauts all for myself."

  • Wilkie wrote (see)

    Perhaps it was used as an abbreviation of LUSCIOUS?

    It's completely this...what's the problem Blisters!?

     

    It's not like that nonsense where bad or wicked mean good.

    It's not the tedious overuse of words random or the loathsome "banter"

    And it's certainly not the moronic copying of black american patois saying things like "was good" (what's good...ie what's up...ie how are you), or "all de girl dem", or similar nonsense.

  • Lush cosmetics factory is situated on the same industrial estate where I work...I say work where I go to drink tea and lean on things......

    The smell is glorious and covers the smell from the sewage farm, dump and foul smelling pond very well

  • Definition of lush adjective
    • 2British informal sexually attractive.
    • very good:I had some really lush pressies Copied and pasted from the Oxford English Dictionary.
  • Aha, the AQI. Now that is something else that I really do hate.
    (Now that is something else that I really do hate?)
    By contrast, I find a thick Bristolian accent quite comical, "if you get my ideal".

    I don't remember people adopting AQI until Neighbours invaded our shores and was adopted by anyone who lives in Milton Keynes. There was a place that was invented, and 20 years after its major growth phase it had adopted a London overspill/AQI blend for its own accent. Although it is in Northamptonshire, very few people there have that nasal country burr.

  • *coughs* upwardly of course.

    We had lessons in ensuring our intonation rose in our speech. It's important you knowimage

     

  • Isn't MK in Bucks?

  • That just shows how hard I try to avoid the place.

  • I just hate those people who can't get basic geography right..............math and geography is what all children should know from school....how do people expect to be part of normal society if they have such an appalling knowledge of geography...........I wouldn't give them a job with some lack of the basic skills for lifeimage

  • MATH?

    MATH? imageimageimage

    Seren - they've got you! They've Americanised our Seren! image

  • only when talking to pedants.....image

  • When it comes to language I'm sure I commit many sins, but not as many as the cohort that's about 5 years younger than me. I can't even convert some of their latest "words" into text - for example, what is a 'kaah' - seems to be used to imply something's nasty/disgusting, and pronounced as close to a grunt as possible.
    Does anyone else think that the English language is evolving ever-faster? I mean, I know it's changed since Shakespeare's time, but that was 400 years ago, and now there seem to be changes every week.

  • The only word that I think should be banned for life is 'moreish'.  Argggggggg, I hate that word, gives me the heebie-jeebies for some reason.  My cousins who are Welsh have always referred to anything nice as being 'lush', so I always thought that was a Welsh thing.  To me it means an old alkie!

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