Reading as you run

i'm steeling myself for an attempted LSR this afternoon. for company i'm taking a few chapters of the Moby Dick audio book on my ipod.

does anyone else read as they run?

when i was ultra training i went through the complete works of dickens image

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Comments

  • If you are listening to an audio book I would suggest that you have to concentrate on that so you know whats happening in the book. Obviously, this could take your attention away from whats happening around you and lead to an accident ? With music, which I do sometimes lsiten to whilst running, it's just on and in the background.

    Did you have any accidents when listening to Dickens ? Do you want some more image

  • i listen to podcasts all the time when running, it's not caused an accident so far,although it's not so loud that i can't hear what's going on around me, and I have my eyes open when i'm running too

  • I just know that I couldn't do it.  I would have an accident. Probably run into the river.

    Or find that I forgot to "turn right" four miles back.

  • just don't listen to one of those hypnotise yourself to stop smoking or lose weight books, and you should be fine.

  • I've used podcasts in the past but I've recently downloaded some audiobooks for over winter. I never found that I had any problems, apart from laughing at random things on the podcasts.

    Music always tends to make me go faster and I didn't want that on my LSRs...

  • When I started running I used to listen to audiobooks (murder mysteries) and I found it really filled in the time on the long miles...I did find it a bit hard to concentrate on who was who (different voices and such) but I did enjoy it. image

  • like nykie i use them on my LSR's to give my mind something to focus on. I don't like music. i'm going so slowly the chances of an accident are small image

    for short runs I just do without.

    i love reading and being able to take in a novel while getting my run in makes me feel I am multi-tasking.

  • like agent ginger I also run with my eyes open, which is crucial.

  • Dude - Oh, I'm disappointed now. I thought you really meant reading as you run, not listening to an audio book! I like reading as I walk and that's dangerous enough, but reading as you run would be insane and, I imagine, almost impossible due to the book moving too much for you to focus on. BTW Which is your favourite Dickens' book? I usually read one every year and have a few more years to go before I run out.

  • Gul the thought has occurred to me! image often if i've been listening to a bit i particularly enjoy, i'll go home and read it to get the full benefit.

    i'm actually rather fond of the old curiosity shop. not the best story but it's the detail is fantastic. so colourful.

     

  • I read Great Expectations for the first ever time this year...I loved it image

  • i might try murder mysteries furball image

    i used to do them as an actor! fun! image

  • Dude - The Old Curiosity Shop is one I haven't read yet; thanks for the recommendation.
    Great Expectations is one of my favourite books, Furball. When I finish the list, it will be one of the first I re-read!

  • if you like dickens you might enjoy Wilkie Collins. they were contemporaries and pals. his are more plot-driven than Dickens but still excellent. 'moonstone' and 'woman in white' in particular.

  • I've tried listening to talking books while I run, but I don't like talking books per se, so it doesn't work. I just wear an MP3 player hung round my neck and listen to music and/or the occasional podcast as I run.

    I also like to carry a dictaphone in my pocket when I'm out running (and to wear something that has a pocket, to keep it in, preferably zipped up). Things occur to me when my mind is in running mode that  get lost and forgotten if I don't have the means to make a record of them there and then.

  • that's a nice idea colin.

    i wouldnt say anything particularly noteworthy ever occurs to me other than 'this hurts' or 'OMG THIS IS AWESOME' but it would be nice to document how I felt.

  • Technically you're listening rather than reading? Much less awkwardimage

    Me, I like R4 Friday night comedy podcasts. Give me the giggles, and no more dangerous  than listening to the radio while driving..

  • true image

    my work involves visually-impaired people and we often use audio books. they use the words 'read' and 'watch' when they talk about audio described movies or telly, so I tend to use those.

    i'll have a look at the podcasts. i like readig/listening to the classics but they can be a bit heavy. thanks! image

  • Ah, thanks for the insight.

    Just be prepared for strange looks from peeps if you're having a giggle!

     

  • I remember a friend running a 20 miler listening to a marketing book once. Hardly riveting but now he's a CEO and founder of a company with over a hundred employees dealing in billions of pounds. For the record I beat him comfortably but it looks like it was time well spent.
  • it'd be even more dangerous to nod off on a run! it nearly happened once when i was hungover image

    good for your friend though.

  • I often used to listen to audio books whilst running, but I've got into the habit of running au naturale nowadays image

    Stephen Fry reading the Harry Potter books to me was always a favourite image

  • I can't imagine anything worse !

    (Well I can)

  • oh no not stephen fry! can't stand the man image

     

  • He's a bit smug sounding for a LSR I agree image
  • I've had a look on iTunes at the Dracula audio book. They seem to range from ??1.95 up to about ??15 and they are all of a similar length. The narrators are mainly people I've never heard of so why is there such a big difference in price ?
  • Presumably, because there are plenty of mugs who will pay a higher price for anything than they need to without doing their homework first. 

    e.g You can buy a used paper copy of "The Casual Vacancy" for a mere £38.58 plus £2.80 p&p on Amazon, even though a brand new copy in Tesco would only cost you £9.

  • I think you're on to a winner, tda.  If the govt can reclassify listening to someone else reading aloud as 'reading' then we've solved the education crisis in one go!

  • Cheerful Dave wrote (see)

    I think you're on to a winner, tda.  If the govt can reclassify listening to someone else reading aloud as 'reading' then we've solved the education crisis in one go!

    And the obesity crisis, cos it's the only reading you can do while running!  "Are you breathing comfortably?  Then I'll begin..."

    image

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