Dealing with dog owners

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Comments

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    I was once attacked by some dogs being walked/emptied by some pathetic dogwalker. He had no authority and the dogs (9) knew it. Thanks to wearing several layers of clothing I got away with a slightly nipped arse. Another dog owner observed this and once clear of the trouble grabbed me as I passed. It seemed that his rather small dog had been attacked by this pack and the dog walker had pretty much said 'what the hell can you do about it?'. 

    With an element of shame I'll cast a veil over our combined actions but in mitigation all I'll say is that if the dog walker had no van insurance he had only himself to blame.

  • I often run along narrow canal paths and through narrow paths in the woods, and I must say in general, most dog owners are great, some show definite dog restraining by stopping or simply showing signs of holding more firmly to the lead. But I agree the owners know their dog and their behaviour, however, runners who never met the dog, no matter how cute (the dog, I mean), would not know if the 'interested' dog is simply being friendly or otherwise, and it is eaasy to assume otherwise and take precautions if possible!

    However, I once ran onto a cross roads in the woods, and there were 3 lads and a big dog off it's lead ahead, so I heistated and decided to run a different route, and got shouted at by the lads about why I'm scared of their wandering dog etc!

    I appreciate it when dog owners show that they are aware I may not like their dogs coming after me, friendly or not, and I always make a point to thank them. Although once as I thank the owner who sat his dog down whilst I ran past, the dog started barking at me! image

  • RicF you should be ashamed.....it was not the vans fault.

  • Which race was that Small?
  • JeremyG wrote (see)
    Which race was that Small?

    It was the Templar 10.

  • Thought so, I ran it. I wasn't right in front but can guess the person you had problem with! As I went by they were shouting 'you should learn some fucking manners' which was a bit of pot kettle etc. all the other walkers with dogs that I passed were really good.

    Oh and big thanks to all you marshals and organisers I really enjoyed the race!
  • Thank you JeremyG 

    I agree, the other dog walkers were very polite. I could not believe that woman! 

    Glad you enjoyed the race. image

  • One small but important point triggered by Small - don't look a dog in the eyes, in dog body language that can be interpreted as aggression on your part. Not saying all dogs will react but badly/not trained dogs may do.

    Caveat - I do engage my dogs in staring but that's because I'm their Alpha and they know it.

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  • Do you even know what a dog looks like Colin?

  • Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)

    Dogs are only interested in you because you are a fast-moving object. 

    The solution when pestered by a dog is to stop being a fast-moving object. Stand perfectly still. The dog will lose interest in you very quickly.

    Then resume your run when it is safe to do so.

    If the dog shows interest again, stand still again. Eventually the owner will take an interest too, and call the mutt away.

    It's very simple.

     

    You don't half post some utter fanny.

    Do the majority of the posters on here strike you as particularly "fast moving"?

    Do you think every single dog reacts the same way?

    Maybe the next time some angry nasty dog confronts you, you'll test out "just standing still". See if it's quite that "simple"

    image

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  • You're a character Colin, I'll give you that. image

    But trust me, i've found how to deal with dogs this far in. And there isn't a one tactic fits all approach. That is, unless you don't mind standing there still for 15mins while a dog leaps up in your face while some hapless owner is given a right run around image

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    Difficult to deal with more than one 'shit machine' at a time. But what I do if a dog comes racing across at me is to stand still and just raise my leg. If it keeps going, it just runs into the bottom of my foot. I'll do the same for the dog.

  • Just had a read of the entire thread and to be honest I think its a shame the majority of dog owners cant simply keep there dog on a sensible length lead (not one of them stupid 3mile long ones) because there is a small minority of people who can literally command there dog to stop right at the side of the path/trail until another command is given. But as a runner untill your past the dog you have to assume the dog will do the worst if you want to be safe.



    Shouldn't dog owners own pride make them keep control of there dog.

    I'd be a bit embarresed if I didn't have complete control of a dog, because lets be honest they really are a pest if not well trained.



    Also I dont see why runners should have to slow or even stop whilst out training. Most paths are plenty wide enough for people to pass each other with one pedestrian having to think there about to be attacked at any moment. So with proper leads (not extendable) and basic control this wouldn't be a problem



    Sorry for going on I just dont like shit machines or there dogs.
  • SideBurn wrote (see)

    Jane, I do worry about meeting someone like you with my dog. She is a fantastic dog well trained and disciplined (no I never hit or hurt her) but I suspect that even she would be unpredictable if she met you; I suspect she could interpret your nerves as aggression. She thinks everyone is her friend and everyone fusses her and says how wonderful she is. She is a pleasure to walk/run with and just runs around looking for scents etc. I would suggest watching a few episodes of 'The Dog Whisperer' good old Caesar Milan is a bit of a loon but comes out with some good stuff about dog psychology.

    Lardarse; you would not call my dog 'a cold blooded killer' if you saw her fussing our pet rabbits and chickens then chasing, catching next doors cat (that takes too much of an interest in the chickens and rabbits) before letting it go and chasing it again!

    And +1 for the people who bag up dog muck and chuck it somewhere? Or do not clear it up (Max's Mum) it does my nutimage

    Like jane I was bitten as a child, I was riding my bike, dog came came from no where, attacked me without any provacation, eye contact or anything. So there are no safe dogs, stop feeding your dog for a few days and see how "playfull" it is with your chickens.

    I don't see playfull happy dog, I see barking agressive horrible mutt with huge teeth.

    SideBurn wrote (see)

    RicF you should be ashamed.....it was not the vans fault.

    If I ever get bitten again it won't be the a van that dies, the dog will. And if a dog attacked my daughter... heaven help the conscientious dog owner...

    Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

    One small but important point triggered by Small - don't look a dog in the eyes, in dog body language that can be interpreted as aggression on your part. Not saying all dogs will react but badly/not trained dogs may do.

    Caveat - I do engage my dogs in staring but that's because I'm their Alpha and they know it.

    Why should I not be allowed to look anywhere I damn well like without fear of being attacked? That you're their "alpha" (how pathetic, you feed them?! Duh! pmsl) is an admission that dogs are pack animals and agressive in packs and need restraint, but since that can't be guaranteed they really have no place on this planet outside of a zoo.

  • Though Lardarse's view may be very hard I have to agree with some of the sentiment, why should runners or anybody else have to look away because a dog owner does not control their dog.  The onus is on them not the runner.  As Andy the Deerstrider says they should be on leads. 

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  • And your stance when it has bitten somebody, make allowances!

  • Owners have a responsibility to keep their dogs 'under control'. There's no problem with a dog that is under control. When it's jumping up a nd trying to lick my face while the useless fecker who is out with it says something glib about 'he's just curious' is out of order. If you can't control your dog , don't have one

    It is a free country for humans. Not animals.

  • Agree pmo, a free country does not mean letting all the dogs loose to do whatever they want while the owners take no responsibility, which most do and do really well, as somebody else mentioned because they have pride.  As with most subjects that cause debate it is the exceptions we are talking about here.

  • i agree that dog owners have to keep their dogs under control...

    but like Colin.unless its a race i would always slow down near a dog and stop if i need to to........

     if the dofg is running around having fun then its not actually bothering you......it could easily run across my path  ..........

    i have no more right to be able to run down a path in a straight line doing my own thing than anyone else does.....

    manners by both parties make the world a better place...

    the dog owner calls its dog to heel.....i slow down and stop if needed giving it time.......we both smile say hello and go off in different directions carrying on doing our own thing.......

    its selfish runners and selfish dog owners that spoil it all....those that feel they have a right to do what they want and that their right is more important than anyone elses.....

     i also agree that dogs shpould never jump up on people under any circumstances and these come under my heading of selfish dog owners

  • Seren I agree with you to a certain extent but selfish runners, and they know who they are, don't bite people or intimidate them.  As a dog owner you are used to dogs, some of the people that have commented on this thread are petrified of them and find passing one off a lead as intimidating as getting off the Tube at midnight in Finsbury Park.

  • Yeah, but there are some real dogs hanging around Finsbury Park at midnightimage
  • "Can't understand language". 

     I suppose I've trained mine with sign language then? There are plenty of words we spell in our house because the dogs do understand speech, in both English and German.

  • Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)
     

    Executive summary: If a dog is a nuisance, just stop, fold your arms across your chest, and stand completely still. Avoid eye contact with the dog.  Easy. The dog will be surprised, puzzled, disappointed, and then lose interest in you. You'll be surprised and amazed how quickly it changes the whole scenario.

    "Executive summary" image

    Do like the idea that dogs are free to do what they like though.

    When I last checked it was the owner's responsibility to keep them under control. And letting them run wild, aint that.

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭
    Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

    "Can't understand language". 

     I suppose I've trained mine with sign language then? There are plenty of words we spell in our house because the dogs do understand speech, in both English and German.

    Go and ask one to put the kettle on and see how far you get.

    Dogs understand tone not words.

    I have to contend with idiots talking to their animals like they were small children, "oh please don't jump up at the man , come back, come back here, here, here, here, come here, oh don't be so naughty" etc, meanwhile the dog ignores them totally.

  • JF50 wrote (see)

    Seren I agree with you to a certain extent but selfish runners, and they know who they are, don't bite people or intimidate them.  As a dog owner you are used to dogs, some of the people that have commented on this thread are petrified of them and find passing one off a lead as intimidating as getting off the Tube at midnight in Finsbury Park.

    It's a real shame that these people have had bad experiences with a dog, but IMHO just because they are scared of dogs that does not give them the right to expect or require every dog & dog owner they come into contact with to act in the way that they want them to. Fearing or hating, say, all women cause one was nasty to you once, or all men cause one beat you up years ago, or all Japanese people for whatever reason, or all black people for whatever reason... well... that is called prejudice. I think it applies to dogs too. Fearing all dogs because you had a horrible experience with one is just not rational, and expecting everyone else around you to pander to an irrational fear is unreasonable. 

    I consistently find that people who are scared of dogs actually act in such a way as to be 99% of the problem themselves. I walk/run my dog off the lead, but when I see people approaching, I put him on the lead, slow him down, and make him walk past on my outside, so I am between him and the person we are passing. He almost never pays any attention to other people, but many times we have walked past a dog phobic person who has suddenly twitched in fright, squealed, stuck their hands in the air and sped up as they pass us. So the dog looks round - doesn't bark, doesn't move towards them, doesn't tug on the lead, just LOOKS ROUND, and they squeal louder and panic even more beacause a perfectly calm dog on a short lead is just LOOKING in their direction.

    I honestly do sympathise with people who are scared of dogs, but in situations like the one I describe, which happens more often than you'd think, the problem is theirs, not mine and definitely not my dog's.

    I'm not saying that all owners and all dogs are blameless of course. I do detest bad owners and genuinely out-of-control dogs.

  • Stevie G . wrote (see)
     

    You don't half post some utter fanny.

     

     

    RicF wrote (see)
     

    Go and ask one to put the kettle on and see how far you get.

     

    Sorry if I'm not taking this thread seriously enough right now but it's thrown up a few little gems this morning.

    *chuckle*

    As you were...

    Down boy!

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