I've received a parcel, and its not for me...

The parcel is for the previous occupant of the house, who I have no contact details for.  Do I:

a) Phone the shipper and arrange for it to be returned to them

b) Ask the letting agency to pass on a message to her, assuming they have her forwarding details

c) Open the parcel and keep it for myself

d) Send it to my secret santa and save myself a couple of bob

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Comments

  • So what would you lot do?  Are you honest, or opportunistic?

  • If  you dont want it I will have it..

  • Now thats the next part of the game Dave.  What could be in there?  Any ideas?

     

  • It's obviously a severed body part.
  • It could well be.  The previous occupant was going through a divorce and I believe that there was some unpleasantness

  • i wouls take it to yhe local post office sorting depot and leave it there saying no longer at the address return to sender

  • Easy open it if its chocolate or something else nice keep it, if its not throw it in the bin
  • That happened to me with an Amazon parcel. I called them, expecting that they'd arrange for someone to collect it. They said I should send it back at my expense then send them the receipt so they could credit my account with the postage cost. Bugger that, I never bothered and they've never chased me up for it. It's still sitting here nearly a year later, so some charity shop is going to get an electric wok shortly.
  • Letting the letting agent know about it and see if they can contact the owner. If that doesn't work, you could always contact the parcel company. Then if you don't have any success you can keep it.

    Ask yourself this. If someone else received a parcel that was meant for you and they kept, I bet that you wouldn't like it.

    Earn yourself a gold star and be honest.

  • Maybe the parcel receiver has been up to no good and haven't left a forwarding address. If you're lucky like Cheerful Dave you too good be the recipient of a once in a lifetime gift
  • You have to pass it on to the real owner, anything else is simply dishonest, and personally I wouldn't want anything dishonestly obtained
  • B.

    If it's been bought online they may have just forgotten to change the shipping address.

  • As long as it's not sh1t in an envelope I would open it.

  • WombleWomble ✭✭✭
    Presuming it fitted through your letterbox (or you wouldn't have accepted it?) then write "Return to sender" on it and stick it in one of those big red post boxes.
  • I had a fishing rod and bait mistakenly sent to my address earlier this year, it was bloody hard work getting it returned and/or finding the correct address.  I thought about taking up fishingimage

    C would be my informed choice now

     

     

  • It's not your job to chase the previous occupant.  I'd either shove it in the post box marked return to sender, or if it's too big, contact the supplier as per Cheerful Dave above.  Also, wouldn't do anything that would cost you money (again as per Cheerful Dave) so if they don't give you a freepost address, it's their loss.

    I'd def hang onto it for a few days in case previous occupant contacts you - I know that a forumite had a parcel delivered to her previous address due to a cock up on the part of the shipping company and I believe she tried to contact them in order to go and collect it.

  • e) give the parcel to the letting agent and let them sort it out. I regard it as part of the job the agent gets paid to do.

  • A, but if that was going to be too much work (like they wanted me to pay for shipping it back) then B.

  • I'll give you a fiver for it and take my chances with the contents! Can you post it to me please?

  • cheerful Dave, charity shops wont't take electrical items .. I'll have it image

     

  • Cheerful Dave wrote (see)
    That happened to me with an Amazon parcel. I called them, expecting that they'd arrange for someone to collect it. They said I should send it back at my expense then send them the receipt so they could credit my account with the postage cost. Bugger that, I never bothered and they've never chased me up for it. It's still sitting here nearly a year later, so some charity shop is going to get an electric wok shortly.

    Another bad story about those tax-avoiding ******s.

    Amazon act as a middle-man for quite a lot of their sales, so small companies use their platform.  The reason why Amazon were so uninterested was that they themselves would not lose out. In fact, they've probably won a bit of free publicity from you as you naturally share your anecdote with friends.

    But that wok was undoubtedly ordered by someone, and some small company somewhere will have suffered a loss - both in admin, and replacement costs.

    Amazon do nothing but look after number one... they don't care.  Boycott them.

    As for the OP.... Return to Sender.

  • Run Wales wrote (see)
    Cheerful Dave wrote (see)
    That happened to me with an Amazon parcel. I called them, expecting that they'd arrange for someone to collect it. They said I should send it back at my expense then send them the receipt so they could credit my account with the postage cost. Bugger that, I never bothered and they've never chased me up for it. It's still sitting here nearly a year later, so some charity shop is going to get an electric wok shortly.

    Another bad story about those tax-avoiding ******s.

    Amazon act as a middle-man for quite a lot of their sales, so small companies use their platform.  The reason why Amazon were so uninterested was that they themselves would not lose out. In fact, they've probably won a bit of free publicity from you as you naturally share your anecdote with friends.

    But that wok was undoubtedly ordered by someone, and some small company somewhere will have suffered a loss - both in admin, and replacement costs.

    Amazon do nothing but look after number one... they don't care.  Boycott them.

    As for the OP.... Return to Sender.

    Can I wait until after Christmas? image

  • JF50 wrote (see)

    Can I wait until after Christmas? image


    Excuse me... but I had only just dismounted my high horse.. and now you've made me climb back on again.  The answer is No !!!

    If you MUST use Amazon, then if the product is to be supplied  by a third party (which I think is most of the time), then:

    • the price in the upper right of the screen, is accompanied by words something like  'in stock. Sold by XYZ Limited.'  (there are other companies named as 'Other Buying Choices' underneath it)
    • Google XYZ Ltd and buy direct from their site.
    • That company will be saving about 10-15% Amazon fees - which they MIGHT be prepared to at least share with you if you asked - could be worth it on big items.
    • You may well find that the headline price on their website is different to the one on Amazon...  often they use computer algorithms to move prices around.  But I'm quite sure that, even if they won't drop the price below that offered on Amazon, they would certainly match it.
    • So you may save money. But if you don't, you get the warm feeling that your business is going to a company that is likely to be paying its taxes in the UK, rather than to Luxembourg. image
  • E mmyE mmy ✭✭✭
    Peter Everitt wrote (see)

    I'll give you a fiver for it and take my chances with the contents! Can you post it to me please?

    Are you paying the postage?image

  • Once it's in the system for the royal mail they have a legal obligation to make sure it is deleived and not your problem chuck. I would put no longer at this address on it and send it back through a post box or through a post office. Unless it's chocolate in which case we can split it? image 

  • Run Wales.why on earth blame amazon...........the small companies chose to use them .its their choice..it must be beneficial to them or they would not do it

  • I was specifically blaming Amazon for taking no interest in getting the electric wok back for the small company. The small company being their customer.

    And of course the small company chooses to sell through Amazon... but what alternative is there? Amazon is a company that has gained a dominant position in this country - by taking advantage of ridiculously outdated laws (which you can argue is not their problem)... but then stretching the use of those laws well beyond moral acceptability.

    IMO, they have practically stolen their dominant position - and used their tax avoiding advantage to putting lots of fair-minded, tax paying British people out of business - which feeds the monster by giving them an even less competition.

     

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