Complete running newbie

Hi all,

This is my first post so wil start it with a little back ground.

At the end of August just before my 43rd birthday my weight had reached 16st 3 lb.

I decided enough was enough  and my slide from sporty person to sofa slob had to stop.

 Since then I have exercised 6 times a week and given my diet a complete overhaul.

For the first couple of months my exercise was always on my Tunturi crosstrainer then from 17th October I started cycling initially 12 miles and now over 50 miles on 3 occasions.

This all brings me up to 25th November, with my weight now down to 13st 13lb and the weather too bad for my road bike I decided to try my hand at running, It couldn't be that bad I can cycle 50 miles so how hard can it be? I was so wrong I managed 2.6 miles in 27 minutes and thought I was going to die.

I was never! going to run again.

For some reason I didn't stop running my 2nd run was bad 3rd ok 4th was good and now today my 5th was fun worked hard and did 4 miles in 36 minutes.

The last couple of runs have been 4 miles and my ankles have given me pain after .

I bought some New Balence Trail running Trainers as I intend to do a mixture of road and trail.

Is it normal for ankles to hurt to start with? I am guessing it must be to do with the impact they are taking.

Would a pair of insoles help?

If I intend to do a fair amount of running would it help to go for a shoe fitting?

Is 14st still to heavy to run? should I get my weight down a bit more first?

Sorry for all the nieve newbie questions, but I am enjoying my new sport and want to get it right so that my ankle pain dosn't become an injury.

 

Comments

  • How many days rest are you having between runs? You might just be doing too much too soon.
  • Hi Millsy 1977, don't think that is it, I am only running at most twice a week.

  • I know it sounds daft but 4 miles is a bloody long distance for your first few runs.



    Yes some on here do marathons each week it doesn't mean that they started at 4 miles. It could be that, going for a shoe fitting is a worthwhile idea. Loosing another stone cannot do any hard, will it help your ankles probably not, small chance t might. Different peoe Hirt differently when they start running, I guess it is most not icicle in whatever weak spots you have in your body, turns out for

    Se reason that is your anklesimage



    I'd try going slower, when you go further you realise it's

    Not all about speed in training so as an experented I'd try forcing yourself to go slower and see how you feel.



    Steph
  • Oh forgot to say... For my first month of running I was in agony pretty much 24x7 it's hurts but the pain goes and the pride stays forever, sometimes you need to listen to the pain and get it sorted, but sometimes, it's just your lazy body screaming no more, and it needs telling to STFU and get on with it.
  • STFU is my 4LA of the weekimage

    But yes, maybe you are doing too much too soon?

  • Where abouts on your ankles does it hurt? If it is your calf/achilles then it may be that you have a forefoot style and a bit of soreness is to be expected and will go away in a few weeks of regular running. Make sure you stretch afterwards.

    If you are running off road then the uneven impact can strain the ligaments that support the ankle and some specific strength exercise might help.
  • booktrunk wrote (see)
    I know it sounds daft but 4 miles is a bloody long distance for your first few runs.

    Yes some on here do marathons each week it doesn't mean that they started at 4 miles. It could be that, going for a shoe fitting is a worthwhile idea. Loosing another stone cannot do any hard, will it help your ankles probably not, small chance t might. Different peoe Hirt differently when they start running, I guess it is most not icicle in whatever weak spots you have in your body, turns out for
    Se reason that is your anklesimage

    I'd try going slower, when you go further you realise it's
    Not all about speed in training so as an experented I'd try forcing yourself to go slower and see how you feel.

    Steph

    Thanks Steph, what you say makes sense ,but I would find it very hard to slow down a bit, I am a 100% sort of guy its just my nature I guess.

    I am not working towards a marathon or anything 4 miles is the sort of distance I want to do so that is why I got to it so soon, I thought if I can run 4 miles then why would I not do it.

    In the future I might think about the odd 10K but don't think I would ever want to do more than that.

    Lou Diamonds wrote (see)
    Where abouts on your ankles does it hurt? If it is your calf/achilles then it may be that you have a forefoot style and a bit of soreness is to be expected and will go away in a few weeks of regular running. Make sure you stretch afterwards.
    If you are running off road then the uneven impact can strain the ligaments that support the ankle and some specific strength exercise might help.


    The pain is in the ankle joint, feels a bit like a mild sprain, I haven't twisted my ankle in any way, my last run was all on pavement and still got the pain.

     

     


     

     

  • I'd say you've definitely done too much too soon.  You need to give your body time to adapt to the stresses and strains that this new activity is putting on it. 

    Investing half an hour, and a bit of cash, in the local proper running shop would be wise - but they might say that the shoes you have are OK.

    13stone isn't too big to run... neither was 16 stone - and 20 stone would be OK too (as long as the doc says it's ok).   But the heavier you are, the slower you should take the mileage build up.

    Based on you having built a decent level of fitness already, and wanting to run twice a week, I suggest something like this....

    Week 0   Give your running legs a week off, give rest to those ankles (and to other bits that are damaged, but you don't actually know it)

    week 1 do 2 x 2.5 mile runs. 

    week 2, do 2 x 3 mile runs

    week 3 do 2x 3 mile runs

    week 4 do 2 x 2 mile runs.... giving your body a little rest... time to adapt

    week 5  2 x 3 mile runs

    week 6 2 x 3.5 mile runs

    Don't think about timing yourself. Take it slow.  Your heart and lungs don't need too much for now... you've done so much good already, on the bike/gym. You just need to start getting your leg ligaments, muscles and bones, used to the repetitive impact... impact that will do lots of good to things like bone density.  In just 6 weeks, you'll be doing good distances there... and have a much firmer base to move forwards than if you do too much, too soon, and miss 3 weeks because of injury!

    Enjoy it.. the outdoor world is so much more natural and better to explore than the inside of a stuffy gym!  And not bad for calories too...  I used up 1500 cals in a steady 90 minute run last weekend.

     

  • Yep, too much to soon.

    Above all slow down - 4 miles in 34 minutes is way too fast if you're just starting out.

  • Run Wales wrote (see)

    I'd say you've definitely done too much too soon.  You need to give your body time to adapt to the stresses and strains that this new activity is putting on it. 

    Investing half an hour, and a bit of cash, in the local proper running shop would be wise - but they might say that the shoes you have are OK. 13stone isn't too big to run... neither was 16 stone - and 20 stone would be OK too (as long as the doc says it's ok).   But the heavier you are, the slower you should take the mileage build up. Based on you having built a decent level of fitness already, and wanting to run twice a week, I suggest something like this.... Week 0   Give your running legs a week off, give rest to those ankles (and to other bits that are damaged, but you don't actually know it) week 1 do 2 x 2.5 mile runs.  week 2, do 2 x 3 mile runs week 3 do 2x 3 mile runs week 4 do 2 x 2 mile runs.... giving your body a little rest... time to adapt week 5  2 x 3 mile runs week 6 2 x 3.5 mile runs Don't think about timing yourself. Take it slow.  Your heart and lungs don't need too much for now... you've done so much good already, on the bike/gym. You just need to start getting your leg ligaments, muscles and bones, used to the repetitive impact... impact that will do lots of good to things like bone density.  In just 6 weeks, you'll be doing good distances there... and have a much firmer base to move forwards than if you do too much, too soon, and miss 3 weeks because of injury! Enjoy it.. the outdoor world is so much more natural and better to explore than the inside of a stuffy gym!  And not bad for calories too...  I used up 1500 cals in a steady 90 minute run last weekend.  

    Thanks Run Wales, everyone is saying too much too soon, so it must be true,

    the plan you have set out looks good, I will give it a try and let you know how I get on.

    It goes against the grain to give less than 100% but if slow to start will reep rewards later on it will be worth it.

    Screamapillar wrote (see)

    Yep, too much to soon.

    Above all slow down - 4 miles in 34 minutes is way too fast if you're just starting out.

    Cheers Screamapillar, you have helped to convince me to take it steady to start.

  • Maybe I was right all along?
  • Millsy1977 wrote (see)
    Maybe I was right all along?


    LOL

    no one like a smart assimage

     

  • Millsy1977 wrote (see)
    Maybe I was right all along?

    No seriously cheers Millsy, I was wrong, will take it steady for a couple of months

  • Most of us get the running "bug" and go off too fast. Take it steady and enjoy it!
  • Simon. Good for you for getting going. As others have said you're going WAYYY too fast (and probably too far) too soon. Almost guaranteed to result in injury and demotivation. Running is so much harder on your legs than cycling. Slow down by 25 % (or more) and cut right back. It really shouldn't hurt if you're doing it right. Good luck/ Most runs should be 50,60 or 70 % effort if you want any longevity

  • It's really frustrating running slowly, but it does pay off big time - less chance of injury, more able to do more time on your feet - huge increase in aerobic fitness.  I was like you the previous 2 years - If I ran 8 minute miles last week I wanted 7:45 this week - ultimately my times were pretty poor and I felt knackered all the time with aching joints.

  • Yep too much too soon.

    The best way to hey injured is to go at it like a bull in a china shop.

    If you get injured you can't improve.

    Slow down. Have walking breaks. Knock the distance down and then aim to do smaller easier runs but more often.
  • After a whole year I thought I would give a little update as to how I am doing.

    The main thing is I am still running! image

    I have joined a new local running club which has given me a huge amount of help and inspiration. 

    My weight is down to 13st 2lb (would still like to loose another stone)

    I have done a couple of parkruns and intend to do many more (pb 22.36 at the moment)

    I completed the Worksop half marathon (in 1:54 which I was a little disappointed with have done 1:49 in training.

    My goal for next year is just to keep running and see where it takes me, though I do fancy having a go at Triathlon as wellimage

     

  • Woohoo well done image

    oh and happy Xmas, tell us next Xmas how you did in your first Tri

    image

  • Nice 5K time there Simon! - you've a sub 1:45 HM in you there in the near future.  I'm having a second crack at the Grantham (Newton's Fraction) HM in late March next year - not that far from Worksop if you're based round that way.  Really nice course, couple of hills but great views.

  • Hello,i have just started running again after 20 years !(now 53) and i am running three times a week, was out this morning 4.4 miles in 42 minutes and feel okay but i find it difficult to slow down my pace,so interested in earlier posts,does anyone think i am doing too much too quick,i do feel okay after my runs.

  • If you feel ok and aren't getting injured then that's fine.

    If you are shattered, getting injured and grumpy then it's probably to quick image

    Just don't jump before you can walk so to speak, keep it at that sort of distance for a while, as your muscles adapt a lot quicker then the other parts of your legs, so give the rest of your legs some time to catch up before you get to ambitious.

  • Thanks,i know the head tells you to do more but that is very sound advice,thanks.

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