Am I being too generous ? Or am I too tight ?

1235

Comments

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

    Engineering, the country is short on good engineers, has been ever since apprenticeships, does anyone know a decent professional Engineer who cannot find work? I don't.

    Also by professional Engineering I don't mean people who fix fridges or central heating (not to be dismissive) I mean proper Engineering 

    That's a very broad term. What field - mechanical, electrical, software, civil, gentetic... ?

    Engineers Explained

  • Friend of mine is an engineer (oil & gas) although I confess I don't know the specifics. He has to be on site from time to time (Kazahstan,Dubai, Aberdeen), and is on contract (as opposed to staff, moneys better apparently). I'll tell him you can work form home for an extended period and you can get 6 months notice on a contract.

    He was out of work for a year 2 or 3 years ago, did painting and decorating for a summer to keep busy. Maybe his area is specialised hence the "does anyone know a decent professional engineer who cannot find work"
    or he's not decent
    or wouldn't take the salary

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)
    K80 wrote (see)
    That's a very broad term. What field - mechanical, electrical, software, civil, gentetic... ?

    I am qualified in both Mechanical and Electrical engineering to degree level, I also have an MBA. It cost me approx £18k to pay for my qualifications, so please don't make the mistake of calling me lucky. Hard work has been good to me and would be for most people.  

    I'm thrilled for you

  • so what about if you weren't lucky enough to be born with enough genetic intelligence to be able to achieve that level of education........

  • For someone who works so hard, you seem to spend quite a lot of time farting about on this thread.......shouting about how hard you work, ironically enough.

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)
    K80 wrote (see)
    That's a very broad term. What field - mechanical, electrical, software, civil, gentetic... ?

    I am qualified in both Mechanical and Electrical engineering to degree level, I also have an MBA. It cost me approx £18k to pay for my qualifications, so please don't make the mistake of calling me lucky. Hard work has been good to me and would be for most people.  

    I didn't.

  • seren nos wrote (see)

    so what about if you weren't lucky enough to be born with enough genetic intelligence to be able to achieve that level of education........

    No, it's all just laziness according to Nick.

    I will agree though that we need to offer more practical apprenticeships of all kinds - university isn't the answer for a lot of people. 

     

  • Nick, it sounds like you have been very lucky.

  • I'd say you were lucky to be able to afford £18k for an MBA...I'm not saying you didnt work hard to get it

  • Cheers Nick ... Keep paying the taxes, and the spongers will love you for ever

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

    Too true Dave, and by the time I get to pension age the gravy train will have left

    Reach pension age ?   Doubt you will manage to get to 95 at the rate you will have to work

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

    Ha ha it would be funny if it wasn't about to come true,

    It's OK I think it's hilarious

  • Screamapillar wrote (see)
    xine267 wrote (see)
    Fair enough, so actually what the government spends your taxes on is irrelevant to your choice not to donate money to charity image  

    Well it shoud be - unless you have some strange idea, like Nick does, that it's all somehow going to benefit scroungers and not paying valuable people like nurses, policemen and prison warders.

    No, I don't have that idea at all. I find it very odd that people feel the need to justify or whitewash the decision not to give to charity they will trot out the argument "I pay my taxes, so I don't need to"

    Fine if they don't want to give money to charity, but why not just say so? No need to act like paying tax is altruistic and paying higher rate tax is the same as donating extra money to charity.

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

    GR I'm not lucky at all I come from a council house background and a poor family, I don't think I'm particularly gifted with anything other than a hard working mentality. I was not lucky to be able to afford my training, I put it out because I was confident I'd pull it back, I paid for it because I didn't smoke or drink. If these are the responses to someone who is basically only hard working, and advocating hard work as a potential cure for the malaise in the country. Then frankly you all need to look at yourselves, we get what we deserve. 

    Well said Nick. You've worked hard and invested in your education and training, instead of spending the money on drinking and smoking. I can't see why anyone could knock you for that.

  • "I was not lucky to be able to afford my training" ?
    £18k over what? 6 years, thats £3k a year or 20% of the salary of many a high street manager. Are they not hardworking? I would say that you are lucky that you could afford that as well as (or instead of?) bringing up a family, and paying the household bills.
    If that means that people who choose well paid occupations such as engineering are more hardworking then I fear you are seriously deluded. I would say that you made a wise decision in choosing a profession that is recession proof, but that hardly makes you a harder worker.
    You should however have been all set for early retirement by now, after all you could have persisted with the £3k a year in savings, plus redundancy payouts, plus the pay increases (more after each bout of redundancy) so that a state pension shouldn't even feature. Perish the thought your kids have to fork out for charity cases such as old spongers....

  • You will be distracting Nick from his engineering dustin if you aren't careful

  • Ha! No one is knocking him for that. I'm wondering why he feels the need to say that taxes = charity instead of simply saying that he doesn't want to give to charity.

    I would like to know what is so special about having a working class background, paying for your own education (while not smoking and drinking) and ending up with a decent job and a decent salary? I did it, virtually all my friends have done it. So what? People need to get over themselves.  

  • Interesting, Hard work never hurt anyone but the thought of it is killing plenty. I agree with some of Nick's comments (not all) and as an Engineer also agree it's been good to me too. I suspect he's right about good Engineers, rarely if ever out of work.

    Also in the proud working class brigade but I believe that working class is now too lofty an aspiration for many. As for training it's an investment you either make or you don't

  • The thread seems to be morphing away from charity contributions ,and towards the subliminal question of who has the most money.

     

  • Seems to be lots of people with loads of time to post.. Get back to work slackers

  • Good idea, back to basics, I don't give to charity, I did a few runs etc for charities a couple of years back, it cost me a fortune, became an expectation, and never a word of thanks so I gave up and now run and bike for fun. 

  • xine267 wrote (see)
    Screamapillar wrote (see)
    xine267 wrote (see)

    Fair enough, so actually what the government spends your taxes on is irrelevant to your choice not to donate money to charity image

     

    Well it shoud be - unless you have some strange idea, like Nick does, that it's all somehow going to benefit scroungers and not paying valuable people like nurses, policemen and prison warders.

    No, I don't have that idea at all. I find it very odd that people feel the need to justify or whitewash the decision not to give to charity they will trot out the argument "I pay my taxes, so I don't need to"

    Fine if they don't want to give money to charity, but why not just say so? No need to act like paying tax is altruistic and paying higher rate tax is the same as donating extra money to charity.

    Umm...Xine I was actually agreeing with your previous comment and I also agree with this one. 

    Whatever we think of his decision, Nick is quite within his rights not to donate money to charity but trying to justify it by basing his argument on some strange idea about benefit scroungers is entirely flawed and just makes him look - well, a bit silly really. 

     

  • Gee Raff wrote (see)
    Colin McLaughlin wrote (see)
    I gave about 12 doses of blood in my younger days but then stopped giving because I felt I should be paid for it. (Yes, I know it would attract the wrong sort of people, but nonetheless the NHS pays for everything else. Why should they get blood free?)


    I read this yesterday, but couldn't reply because of the restrictions at work but felt I had to ask you Colin what do you mean by "The wrong sort of people?"

    Are you trying to say that blood from people who would want paying is of lesser quality?
       

     

    If the NHS paid for blood donations, it would attract a lot of people very strapped for cash, which would, for example, include a higher proportion of drug addicts, bringing a greater risk of transmission of diseases such as HIV.

     

  • Dave The Ex- Spartan wrote (see)

    Seems to be lots of people with loads of time to post.. Get back to work slackers

    Indeed! I'm just being a total bum todayimage

  • Screamapillar wrote (see)
    Just as well we don't all think like you Colin.

    To actually suggest you be paid for giving blood which might save a person's life, potentially even one of your loved-ones, is astounding. I guess you'll be too mean to donate your organs won't you? God forbid someone should get them for free, even if you're too dead to use them. 

    "Altruism" is clearly not a concept you are familiar with.

    I don't see why it's "astounding" to suggest you are paid a fair price for your body products. You're only "astounded" (if indeed you are astounded??) because you're accustomed to the idea that blood is free to the NHS. If the NHS wants to buy new thermometers, or new beds, or a new scanner, or to have doctors and nurses, etc, the NHS PAYS for it. The NHS pays billions to get what it needs. Exceptionally, the NHS has hived off blood donation into the separate arena of "charitable giving", making it something people are expected to give for free if they give it at all, whereas the NHS has to pay for pretty much everything else it gets. I don't think it's unreasonable for donors to be paid for their body product, seeing as it has a value, and a value to someone else, and I don't think the idea they should be paid for it is "astounding" at all. It's actually rather astounding that the Blood Service manages to get people to give away a valuable product entirely free.

    Organ donation comes into the same category for me, yes. Organ donors could usefully be paid for the donation of something that's of value (in some cases, huge value) to someone else. Not because I'm mean, as you suggest, but because it's fair that me or my estate should be paid for something that has a market value and a value to someone else. If someone buys my house, they pay for it. Why should they get parts of my body free of charge?

    There's actually a shortage of organs which could be eliminated if people were paid for their organs instead of payment being illegal, as I believe it is in this country, so arguments you may have against non-payment are actually weak. People are dying who needn't die, because other people aren't induced to donate by a system of fair payment when there could be a system of fair payment for body parts.

    Altruism is a concept I'm familiar with. I'm also familiar with other concepts, such as reasonableness, people being taken advantage of for their good nature, the laws of supply and demand, common sense, and fairness, and the same people in society being put upon to give, give, give, again and again until they get a bit sick of it and become resistant and cynical.

     

Sign In or Register to comment.