Selling stuff second hand online

My old flat mates moved out recently and we’ve been trying to get rid of stuff that had been abandoned by people over the years. So I’ve been trying to sell a slow cooker. I don’t really need to money and I wasn’t the one who bought it in the first place so I listed it as £15 and planned to spend the money on beer for the house.

I’ve had one woman interested and we arranged she’d come tomorrow. Now she’s messaged asking if I’ll drop the price to £10 to cover her tube fare here. I think it’s a bit cheeky to ask now; I might have been amenable if she’d asked in the first place, but I only live in zone 2 (London), and the area was listed on the original ad.

 

So my question is what would you do?

1/ Take £10 as I don’t have any other offers, I’d like it gone, and I’m not losing anything as I didn’t buy it in the first place

2/ Haggle and offer £12

3/ Tell her I need £15 for her and risk her saying no and having to advertise again etc.

 

If it makes a difference the cooker is on sale in Argos for £35.

Comments

  • I brought mine in Tescos for a tenner when they had their last offer

    For that reason alone i'd let her have it

  • This is completely irrational, but she would have pissed me off by asking me to knock money off without even seeing it and by trying to justify it with a stupid excuse.  I'd rather give it to Oxfam.

     

     

     

     

  • I have a policy with selling second hand stuff. Anything worth less than ??20 goes to the tip or to charity or to recycling. It's not worth the agro and she probably won't turn up anyway.
  • Thanks for all yr input.

    Despite my initial reaction being the same as Mr Puffy, I have now said she can have it for ??10. Will see if she turns up. Will see if she turns up.

    If not, does anyone want to buy a slow cookerimage
  • Only if you give me back my train fare. ??32.60.
  • How slow is the cooker? My wifes pretty slow but I'll swap if it does spuds quicker!!
  • I've always found Gum Tree to be great for selling things.

  • If she has agreed a price then she should pay it, not like it was a sudden surprise she'd have to travel to collect it.
  • She'll sell it at a car boot sale for £15 - trouble is nowadays not all charity shops will take electrical stuff (maybe making myself look silly here as I am assuming a slow cookers is electrical!!!)

  • I wonder if she expects the supermarket to pay for her transport when she does her weekly food shop? image

  • I know we all have differing budgets and purses, but all this hassle for a tenner? I'd just give it to a charity shop or if they don't want it, freecycle or bin.

  • if you fail to sell it and decide to give it away, try Freecycle or Freegle (you need to set up an account but it's free) and offer it on there.  people will gladly turn up and take away things for nothing.   I usually get rid of stuff that the charity shops don't want (usually electrical items) that way.

    I offered a dead tumble dryer recently (rather than try a repair we decided to get a new one) - a bloke happily turned up to collect it as he thought he could repair it himself (and if he did he'd probably sell it on). good luck to him - saved me the hassle of taking it to the skip.

  • Mr Puffy wrote (see)

    This is completely irrational, but she would have pissed me off by asking me to knock money off without even seeing it and by trying to justify it with a stupid excuse.  I'd rather give it to Oxfam.

           

    Amen image

  • for something you didn't pay anything for, or have any attachment to, you do seem very parsimonious

  • Did she pick it up? Did she?
  • Her husband picked it up yesterday.

    Now just have to get rid of the other three boxes of stuff abandoned in the flat. Trouble with giving things to a charity shop is getting round to carrying it downstairs and to the shop!

     

  • As FB says, Freegle/Freecycle is the way to go.
  • With Freegle / Freecycle do people actually turn up? I've heard a few people complain about no-shows.

    Got a couple of things (wardrobe, bed) I want rid of and freecycling them sounds like the easiest option.

  • For the boxes of stuff you could just advertise them as a job lot for someone to sell on a car boot or similar - there are people out there who will buy it, you just need to be reasonable in valuing the content.

    We've bought/sold stuff on Gumtree etc and it is common for people to offer lower than you advertise.  We've also posted stuff out which hasn't arrived which causes a dilema as you don't know the buyer or whether they are being honest (nor them us in terms of our honesty in posting it out - we always keep proof of postage).

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