Physio, How much would you expect to pay?

Hi all,

  I'm not shaking off an injury in which the Doctor said would clear up. I have a marathon end of June. If I ask to see a Physio through NHS it probably won't be until the middle of December image

I was wondering how much I'd have to fork out to see a Physio? I haven't a clue

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Comments

  • Mine's £35 per 40 minute session if you pay yourself, a little more if you're using an insurance policy.

  • DustinDustin ✭✭✭

    £48 for an hour

  • depends where you live, where their office/clinic is, and what their overheads are. I've paid £50 for a 30 min session in the centre of london before, because I was desperate and it was convenient to get to from work. They'll charge as much as they can get away with.

  • Hmm a one off at any of the rates above wouldn't be too bad but if you have to return a few times it could get a bit crazy?

    Do you guys pay for what you get IE if the meeting only takes 20 minutes will you still pay for your hour or 40 minutes etc?

  • You tend to pay for the session.

  • Worth shopping about cos some have specialisms. You need smeone who understands running.

  • £35 for an hour.  This is oop North though.

  • Try the NHS. I've been seen within a week, as has Mrs CB. If it doesn't look like a quick referral then shop around.

  • Really varies, wherever you are. I have one very good physio, who also runs training for my club, and she's about £30 an hour, which is pretty good for Olde Londone Towne.

  • Cheers guys, down here I cant see a Physion without going through my doctor. They are as slow as a week in jail down here!

  • literatinliteratin ✭✭✭

    I think you'd expect to pay about as much per hour as you'd expect to pay for any service involving a certain level of professional expertise/qualifications, plus overheads, public liability insurance etc. £40 an hour seems reasonable for where I live (E. Midlands), it'd be more in central London where rent is higher.

    The question of whether it's worth the money or not, or whether it would get too expensive if  you had to keep going back is a different one - it depends on your budget and how much you need it.

  • Of course, you could get a massage and a huge smile on your face if you're prepared to pay a bit more. So I've heard. Ahem.

  • Peter Collins wrote (see)

    Really varies, wherever you are. I have one very good physio, who also runs training for my club, and she's about £30 an hour, which is pretty good for Olde Londone Towne.

    That is a bargain!

  • Having said that, I think she's actually 40 nicker... oops. Used to be £30 though. It's my age.

  • Stevie  GStevie G ✭✭✭

    "Vicar", go through the Doctor then, and stress you've tried rest, you've tried NSAIDs, and know that a physio will sort you out.

    The when they make the referral and say the physio will contact you, ignore that, and after a few days after you're on the system, ring the place directly and get it brought forward...

    The beauty of the NHS system, is once you're on it, you're on there until healed. None of that horrendous feeling of lashing £30-40 out, feeling no better than you did before hand, yet apparently needing another appointment.

    I had a private physio who seemed to think cricking my back would fix anything. It didn't.

    Proper NHS physio, with the correct stretching and strengthening and I was well away again.

  • JJ2JJ2 ✭✭✭

    I pay £35 for a half hour follow up appointment. First one is a bit more, about £40 I think. I'm in the East Midlands too.

    NHS physio is not unlimited though, there's a great push to limit the number of sessions

  • MuttleyMuttley ✭✭✭

    It's about £40 or so per session, half an hour, here in Reading. Not cheap. And it usually takes a couple or a few sessions to sort out the injury. So each time I get crocked, it'll set me back a ton or more.

    But the clinic is within 5 minutes on the bike and they've always repaired me. You pays your money, you gets a properly qualified practitioner.

  • Barkles wrote (see)

    You tend to pay for the session.

    This is my experience too. for me it has been £40 regardless if it's a 20 minute immediate hands on session, or upwards to 40 minutes including chat about it first.

  • David Falconer 3 wrote (see)
    my physio costs me nothing. Meet Dr Common Sense and Nurse Google.

    And just look at the results you're racking up.....

    Hardly a glowing testimonial for "Dr Common Sense" and "Nurse Google" is it?

    Muppet!

  • PhilPubPhilPub ✭✭✭

    Good old nurse Google.  Apparently all my ailments are either cancer, or a complete figment of my imagination caused by nerve gas spread by the CIA to stop me thinking that 9/11 was anything other than a conspiracy.  Or something.

    AAARRGHH!  THE LIZARDS ARE COMING!!!!

  • Stevie  GStevie G ✭✭✭
    David Falconer 3 wrote (see)
    my physio costs me nothing. Meet Dr Common Sense and Nurse Google.

    if ever there's a glowing recommendation for proper physio!

  • kaffeegkaffeeg ✭✭✭
    PhilPub wrote (see)

    Good old nurse Google.  Apparently all my ailments are either cancer, or a complete figment of my imagination caused by nerve gas spread by the CIA to stop me thinking that 9/11 was anything other than a conspiracy.  Or something.

    AAARRGHH!  THE LIZARDS ARE COMING!!!!

    Love this! 

     

    I paid £45 an hour in Islington. Well worth it if you're in pain/want to recover quickly/understand why you got injured/learn how to minimise injury in the future. 

  • literatinliteratin ✭✭✭
    Stevie G . wrote (see)
    David Falconer 3 wrote (see)
    my physio costs me nothing. Meet Dr Common Sense and Nurse Google.

    if ever there's a glowing recommendation for proper physio!

    How's the knee, David?

  • Stevie  GStevie G ✭✭✭

    David, there's 2 types of injuries, impact, and what they call "over use"

    For impact injuries, rest can often be fine.

    For overuse, simple rest can take the edge off it, but generally won't fix the root causes.

    It's these root causes which physios are genius at picking up and strengthening.

    If you have underlying knee issues, simply resting, and cross training are quite unlikely to sort it.

  • kaffeegkaffeeg ✭✭✭

    David, for you, it doesn't matter anyway. Whether or not you have an injury, you'll still be in the bottom 4, high achiever that you are.  

     

    Hahahahahahha. This is still so amusing. 

  • PhilPubPhilPub ✭✭✭

    I'd like to see anyone shake off femeroacetabular impingement by resting!  Actually, that one even foxed the physio but that's beside the point.  If there's an underlying condition, the sooner you see a professional to get a proper diagnosis the better, even if it involves a referral to a specialist.  If I'd relied on Nurse Google I'd probably have arthritis by now.

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