Illegally downloading films, games, Music - your views?

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Comments

  • mattywarr wrote (see)

    In your example, I would exercise my right to choose a cheaper alternative and book in at a travelodge or premier inn, .

     


    so in your example you should exercise your right to choose a different film that is worth your money at the cinema and not download. 

    after all your only problem is you dont value the product at the price point set.

     

  • Interesting point there, Flob. I hadn't considered it that way.

    But of course, "An eye for an eye and the world goes blind"image

  • flob - next time you are in starbucks and no one is looking you should put some goodies in your pockets.....they owe you due to their tax avoidance  

  • Tax avoidance isn't stealing, and our government isn't allowing tax evasion at all.

  • DeanR7 wrote (see)
    mattywarr wrote (see)

    In your example, I would exercise my right to choose a cheaper alternative and book in at a travelodge or premier inn, .

     


    so in your example you should exercise your right to choose a different film that is worth your money at the cinema and not download. 

    after all your only problem is you dont value the product at the price point set.

     

    No thats not my only "Problem". I've tried to elaborate more in other posts but I guess I'm not doing it very eloquently.

  • I genuinely think martinwarr (what is it goof for ) has made some decent points. But the Premier Inn one wasn't a good one.

  • As someone who works in an 'information industry', I believe that people should always be paid for work they do, whatever it is. Having said that, the internet muddies the water - I did once think that, for example, newspapers were too late, that the bird had flown and people expected stuff that's online to be free. I'm not sure that's the case now - I still prefer reading actual physical newspapers, but I know the number of people like me are declining, and lots of people will pay to download papers, mags and books onto their various digital platforms, so I think publishing companies and others can make it pay. I guess there'll always be people who'll find a way to download anything they want for free, and good luck to them in a way for being so determined. However, like someone said, it's real people's livelihoods we're talking about. What companies that have stuff to download or peruse on the net need to be is cute about what they offer - that means in terms of pricing as well as what's in the actual product.

  • This was my favourite recent story about how a small gaming company tried to deal with piracy piracy game

     

  • Just had a look at Blinkbox, and they've got Game Of Thrones. It's cheaper than BluRay and I could have it now. But...

    If I buy the BluRay I can do all of the following:

    • watch it without an internet connection (on the train, on holiday)
    • watch it on any device (with a BluRay drive)
    • lend it to my friends
    • sell it if I get bored of it
    • still watch it if the company I bought it off goes bust

    Not sure how much of the above I could do with a downloaded movie / TV program (I know music is no problem). Blinkbox say it's "yours to own and enjoy forever", but I'm not sure what the implications of that are.

  • if it wasnt for piracy you would all still be walking around playing cd's. For years the music industry bent us over and didnt even have the courtesy to use lube. then when technology passes these dinosaurs by they suddenly cry foul. Apple isnt the reason you have itunes. piracy forced the music industry to join us in the 21st century.

  • Quite interesting everybodies point of view. Technically yes its stealing to a point but at the same time it seems morally ok??  Is it ok to watch something for free and if you like it purchase it? Then you know you are spending your money wisely?

  • Tom77 wrote (see)

     

    If I buy the BluRay I can do all of the following:

    • lend it to my friends

    still technically illegal i think

  • Not to mention playing it on an oil rig

  • skotty wrote (see)
    Tom77 wrote (see)

     

    If I buy the BluRay I can do all of the following:

    • lend it to my friends

    still technically illegal i think

    My understanding is that public lending is illegal*. So I'm pretty sure lending it to a couple of friends is OK, I'm not sure at what point offering to lend it more widely would be illegal.

    * Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988

  • Flob wrote (see)
    Tax evasion

    I think your confusing tax evasion (illegal) with tax avoidance (legal, morally dubious).

  • Surely anyome who hires an accountant has being guilty of some tax avoidance. Surely that's whay you pay them. 

  • most people don't have an accountant who will dictate to the govt how much tax you have decided to pay.

     

  • I'm avoiding tax - ISA, pension, Premium Bonds, Gift Aid. Is any of that immoral? If not, why not? Where do you draw the line?

    Also, do you think adultery should be illegal? It's immoral after all.

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    Lets face it Vicar, I don't recall any of the 10 commandments saying you can't illegally download films, games or music.

  • RicF wrote (see)

    Lets face it Vicar, I don't recall any of the 10 commandments saying you can't illegally download films, games or music.

    yet more proof that they badly need updating.

     

  • The 11th commandment of any religion. Thou shalt adapt thy religion to suit yourself thou hypocrite.

  • actually it is covered in the original ten anyway:

    “Thou shall not steal."

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭
    skotty wrote (see)

    actually it is covered in the original ten anyway:

    “Thou shall not steal."

    The concept of theft has changed.

    Once it was the physical removal of objects from their rightful owner. Now its just someone moving a finger less than 1mm. Subsequently the recipient can just watch and listen without moving at all. The only thing that moves is the transmission of 1's and 0's.

    And as for the idea that 'there's no harm in looking'. Depends on what you're looking at. 

  • RicF wrote (see)
    The concept of theft has changed.

    Once it was the physical removal of objects from their rightful owner. Now its just someone moving a finger less than 1mm. Subsequently the recipient can just watch and listen without moving at all. The only thing that moves is the transmission of 1's and 0's.

    And as for the idea that 'there's no harm in looking'. Depends on what you're looking at. 

    indeed.

    so if there is an error in internet banking software and you can suddenly credit yourself with 250 million at the click of a button rather than physically robbing a bank that isn't real theft.

     

  • skotty wrote (see)
    RicF wrote (see)
    The concept of theft has changed.

    Once it was the physical removal of objects from their rightful owner. Now its just someone moving a finger less than 1mm. Subsequently the recipient can just watch and listen without moving at all. The only thing that moves is the transmission of 1's and 0's.

    And as for the idea that 'there's no harm in looking'. Depends on what you're looking at. 

    indeed.

    so if there is an error in internet banking software and you can suddenly credit yourself with 250 million at the click of a button rather than physically robbing a bank that isn't real theft.

     

    Hasn't this happened? I seem to recall some couple being the recipients of a software mistake to the tune of millions and trying to scarper. It was theft. They did time.

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    Theft is simply a matter of accountability. The basis is that any exchange of assets between members of society is essentially down to 'your gain' is someone else's 'loss'.

    The telling point is whether your gain is approved by the others. The point of the rich is that they have many others (millions perhaps) approving their gain.

    Theft is simply taking without prior approval. The recipients of the software error gained but without prior approval of the rest of us. We object to that so punish the transgressors for their audacity.

    A lottery win on the other hand is the most extreme example of an individual gaining via the approved loss of the many.

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