Are you and "in" or an "out"?

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Comments

  • They saw what happened to the pound and all the other stuff that's been stirred up?

  • 15West wrote (see)

    I know of two people who voted leave (and I don't know many) and now regret it, one being my Dad. I despair.

     

    Muttley wrote (see)
    Screamapillar wrote (see)

    According the the Beeb, Morgan Stanley is moving its staff out of London...

    No bad thing in my book if they and the others like KPMG, Goldman Sachs etc feck orf.

    The ancillary staff they lay off, such as cleaners, might not see it your way, though I understand why you're saying it.

  • I do hope so.



    I know Norway has a lot of gas and oil reserves - about as much as the UK but only a 12th or so of the population ?

    Iceland has geothermal power and fishing - and is basically the population of Leicester - so plenty of fish for everyone.

    Switzerland - well it hasnt had to rebuild after world wars - and have you seen the price of toblerone and Lindt.



    I'm not sure they're quite the same as the UK ?
  • cougie wrote (see)
    I do hope so.

    I know Norway has a lot of gas and oil reserves - about as much as the UK but only a 12th or so of the population ?
    Iceland has geothermal power and fishing - and is basically the population of Leicester - so plenty of fish for everyone.
    Switzerland - well it hasnt had to rebuild after world wars - and have you seen the price of toblerone and Lindt.

    I'm not sure they're quite the same as the UK ?

    But they have to pay for being in the EEA and accept free movement, two of the main things the leavers were against. We'll probably be the same if we want free trade with the EU so how exactly are we going to be better off??

  • 15West15West ✭✭✭

    Don't they do the free trade/movement thing...but they can't negotiate or veto anything in EEA, or EU, or whatever it's called?

    One problem with EU, is it's all a bit confusing!

  • Just heard BBC news on the radio. People elated and talking about the immigrants.



    Thats what they thought they were voting on.
  • cougie wrote (see)
    I do hope so.

    I know Norway has a lot of gas and oil reserves - about as much as the UK but only a 12th or so of the population ?
    Iceland has geothermal power and fishing - and is basically the population of Leicester - so plenty of fish for everyone.
    Switzerland - well it hasnt had to rebuild after world wars - and have you seen the price of toblerone and Lindt.

    I'm not sure they're quite the same as the UK ?

    We will have to rely on exports of baked goods:  Cornish pasties, Bakewell Tart and Eccles Cakes - but probably not Tunnock's Teacakes...

  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    JT141 wrote (see)
    I can't quite believe what John Redwood has said. Staunch Leave, now talking about a renegotiation with EU without ever finalising the exit. Full access, no immigration, no responsibility. A set of demands that would never conceivably be met, never ending market uncertainty, and a complete disregard of democratic result. Fucking stratospheric arrogance.

    Except that as soon as Atricle 50 is invoked, the UK have NO say or vote on any EU matters.  And the EU could (apparently) decide unilaterally that the outcome of the referendum automatically invokes Article 50, in which case the 2 year exit clock could start ticking next week, when the EU council meet.

    Dachs wrote (see)
    Screamapillar wrote (see)

    The POV of EU nationals living and working in London is sobering.

    Sadiq Khan's Facebook page has a lot of comments about how they no longer feel welcome here. They appreciate his support for them but say they are considering leaving.

     

    This is exactly how my wife feels - originally German, she has been here 15 years and has British citizenship but sees this as a comment on the presence of her and others like her.  It is also how my French sister-in-law, and my French friend feel, both of whom have been here for more than ten years.  Hopefully this is just the immediate disappointment talking, and the whole atmosphere will settle down such that they feel they can stay, but it's all pretty raw today.

    Nigel Farage's wife is German.  She's a whole lot more welcome here than he is.

  • The award for the best comment of the day goes to Nessie! image

  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    I wonder what the actual national cost will be per immigrant no longer coming here. A few million each?
  • MuttleyMuttley ✭✭✭
    PhilPub wrote (see)

     

    I'll see your Adam and raise you a WHOLE FUCKING COUNTY.

    Regrettably, my home turf. Mother of Muttley still lives there. She voted Out.

    EU funds have paid for most of the infrastructure projects in Cornwall for years.

    I despair. But that's what they voted for so tough shit.

  • Screamapillar wrote (see)

    I don't like nationalism but we've all pretty much had it imposed on us overnight anyway so, if Scotland wants to dissolve the Union and stay in the EU they should. 

    Skinny Fetish Fan wrote (see)

    I think only 48% of us have had it imposed on us and only 62% of Scots.

    Screamapillar wrote (see)

    Only? 48 and 62 are quite big percentages! 

    Yes they are but much lower than 100% (all) - sorry for delayed answer, I've been working, those bastard Europeans keep buying things from us!image

  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    Nessie, Redwood was saying they would negotiate advantageous terms for the UK but indefinitely delay applying Article 50. Yes, I know we've just voted to leave and it's fucking nonsense but that's his plan (if you can even call it that). Other brexiteers vary in their utter lack of planning, understanding or strategy as to what to do next.
  • VDOT52VDOT52 ✭✭✭
    Calling the leave voters anything but shortsighted bigots would be harsh. My friendliest neighbours are polish. I'l miss them if the sale of my place actually goes through.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭

    JT - Redwood is even more of an arse than I thought then.  Listening to the radio at lunchtime, apparently the rest of the EU are even more shocked than we are, and see giving any concessions to the UK as being a green light to all the right wing parties already baying for referenda of their own (Netherlands, France, Spain), so will make it deliberately hard and nasty for us to exit.

    I suspect there was a fair bit of "it'll never actually happen, so I can say what I want and use it to beat up the government at every opportunity" in the Leave camp.

  • ZouseZouse ✭✭✭

    Agreed Nessie. I am guessing many 'outers' simply thought they were giving Gub'mint/EU a warning & didn't actually anticipate a marginal win. Tough titties.

    Schulz & Juncker want us out a.s.a.p. Unsurprising, really. They don't want uncertainty in the Union & would also like to show others thinking of leaving that it's far from a comfortable process.

  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    Redwood was speaking this morning so wasn't ignorant of the situation, but pretty ignorant of reality. He could be back on the front bench.

    Looks like the EU want us out ASAP and not have prolonged internal disruption. Two years may be long enough to negotiate coming out, but probably not new trade deals. That work might have to be done after leaving the free market. Then there's all our national legislation that needs going through. And trade deals with all other markets. We could double Whitehall and have them do nothing else and this is still years and years of work. Bureaucracy eh? Thank heavens we voted out to get rid of all of that.
  • Big_GBig_G ✭✭✭
    I have a few close Dutch friends, most of who have been and living and working here for over 5 years. I spoke to one earlier and she was saying she is kind of feeling uncomfortable walking down the street knowing that on average one-in-two people probably don't really want her here (whether that's true or not, that's what she's feeling currently). I must say, even I've felt that a bit in terms of knowing that half the people around me voted out and finding that a bit strange.



    I voted to remain, but I don't think that those who voted out are stupid or gullible necessarily. There are issues with the EU, and I guess the Leave campaign resonated with more people, but like many here I am shocked with the result. I just hope that somehow the politicians can reunite the UK, but I worry that's more wishful thinking than anything.
  • D'you know... the ONLY good thing to come out of this debacle is reading the vast majority of comments on this thread and realising what a genuinely great bunch of people are on these forums. I had always thought that was generally the case - but now it's being well and truly demonstrated... lots of well reasoned and well thought out comments from clearly intelligent and well informed folks.

    All the talk of having two years to get our house in order - not if the EU want us on our way sooner, as seems to be the case. Article 50, while being touted as a "road map" for exiting, is, apparently, extremely vague with no clear directions about what exactly is expected/required in this situation - presumably because no one really believed it would ever be needed.

    I too, like Muttley, despair of my homeland - Ma & Pa are well aware of the benefits Cornwall has received from the EU and both voted remain (in fact my mum is also an EU immigrant (Danish)). They will be gutted - I haven't found the courage to phone them yet.

  • BTW - booktrunk... hope your car is OK and didn't roll out into the road in a bid for freedom image

  • 15West15West ✭✭✭

    Denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. On the anger bit now. Pissed off. Going for a run earlier helped, now hoping a beer will help me a bit more.

    I hope Scotland gets its independence.

  • Reading this thread today, I can only 'assume' that the Remain voters have as much hatred for the Leave voters as the Remain voters seem to 'assume' that the Leave voters have for immigrants/EU parliamentarians/Dave Cameron/[insert other stereotype].



    As far as I'm concerned the worst thing to come out of today's result is not that fact that we are leaving the EU (for that is how I voted), but the division and contempt amongst people who would otherwise be friends.



    It's getting really tiresome listening to how "52% of the country must be complete fucking numpties". Sure, there have been some plonkers quoted in the press today, but take your own advice and don't base your entire beliefs on what the media shows you.



    The vote has happened, the result is known, it's not going to change, that's democracy folks.
  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    Out of curiosity.

    How does this decision actually affect your lives right now?

  • MuttleyMuttley ✭✭✭
    http://www.thepoke.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/944602_558519610855003_1418641117_n.jpg

     Excellent camera work image

  • XX1XX1 ✭✭✭

    Pudge -- Agreed.

    We are where we are...  Time to look forward, not backwards.

  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    Interesting!

    What is it?

     

     

  • 15West15West ✭✭✭

    Nope. Still in the anger bit.

  • Pudge - not hatred, just a bit of bafflement and despair... and genuine concern that many of the leave voters are some of the poorest in this country and there is every chance that they will become even less well off, both financially and in terms of service provision, in this "brave new world".

    So - no - not hate, sadness... real sadness.

    image Muttley - nice!

  • i am sure you had a better reason for voting to leave than many others, Pudge, but others made their decision based on believing lies that others could see right through. it is concerning (and encouraging for the links of Donald Trump) that you can tell complete untruths and be believed.

    Anyone that voted to leave based on the promise of NHS funding was duped, plain and simple.

    At the very least it is not a good situation when the will of the elderly has been imposed in the young. 

  • MuttleyMuttley ✭✭✭

    But if the young can't be arsed to vote ...

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