Protein Powders (Help)

Afternoon All,

Kind of new to Running scene (about 4months) and really enjoying it. My question to you though is what Protein Powders do you take after a Run??

Comments

  • Hi, it wouldn't let me post a link because I'm new here but there are articles about it on the Runners world site and they're airly helpful if you can find them. 
    "Stay away from negative people. They have a problem for every solution." -Albert Einstein.
  • HA77HA77 ✭✭✭
    Eat proper food and don't waste your money. If you eat a good diet you don't need it.

    Great that you're enjoying your running.
  • I use them on occasion but very rarely being honest. after a track session sometimes. I use my protein's impact whey.   N.B. a glass of milk is enough protein and carbs as a recovery drink for runners. save your money. 
  • I am currently training for the Southampton marathon in April, so this week did 34 miles running 6 times a week. To aid muscle recovery I use the PhD diet whey, currently on the banana flavour to give me more protein in my diet. I normally have it on my porridge oats, and not in a shake, as porridge oats by itself is rather bland.
    If you're not doing many miles in a week then a diet including protein (chicken /fish) and carbs ( wholemeal rice) diet would be enough.
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭
    Eat a healthy well balanced diet, don't waste your money.   Definitely not needed for distance runners irrespective of your mileage.
  • I ran the Southampton Marathon last April in 4.10 aged 71. I don't use powders, gels or energy drinks. A good diet, as others have said, is adequate. You do, of course, have to do appropriate training/mileage to successfully complete distance races.  
  • Thanks everyone. I will take everything onboard. And keep the healthy eating going ???
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭
    hillstrider - you're a fine example to us all to keep on with the training, there's no shortcuts.

    Incidentally while munching on my post run breakfast I was adding up the protein content, 2 eggs 12g protein, 2 slices of toast 10g protein, 2 milky coffees 4g protein so that's 26 g of protein without including the spread on my toast or the yogurt with my fruit.

    Thanks everyone. I will take everything onboard. And keep the healthy eating going ???

    and save the money, you can put that cash towards new shoes/kit :)
  • Shades.. we're all different, but as long as we all get the required amount of protein and carbs in our body for running, then that is what really matters. i can't be bothered with cooking eggs and toast in the morning, in fact I normally eat breakfast at around 9.30am when at work, so it gives me energy for the lunchtime run at 12ish...I just prefer a bowl of oats with two scoops of protein powder..same result really.. plus my porridge tastes much better with the powder in it...
  • I have to admit I'm in the protein powder camp. I like to put it in my oats like Dave or I'll have it as a drink for breakfast along with some toast and peanut butter, as it adds to the fluids I need post-run. I like a sweet breakfast versus a savoury one, and like Dave I can't be arsed to cook in the morning.
    It also works out a lot cheaper than meat, so the point about saving money is moot (but then I use it as a food source, not as a supplement).

    Protein powder was first popular with strength athletes (bodybuilders, power lifters, strongmen etc) who have to eat a lot of protein and can't afford or can't stomach a lot of meat and eggs in one day. We runners have different goals but we still need protein to help us repair muscle broken down during runs and the advantage of protein powder is that whey is absorbed quickly (fat slows absorbtion so eggs and meats will be broken down much more slowly, which is great if you want to stay full for longer but not so good if you want to get protein to the muscles as soon as possible).

    Other advantages, aside from the obvious convenience, is that it's a good protein source for people who don't eat meat for personal or religious reasons (you can even get vegan powders such as hemp or pea protein, though I can't comment on how complete a protein you are getting or whether they taste OK).
  • JGavJGav ✭✭✭
    Any advice on the type of protein powder we endurance athletes should be using?  There's so many different categories and price points out there.

    My story is that from a period of using MyFitnessPal to log everything for a number of weeks I learned I don't get enough protein in my diet.  Was thinking about using powders to top up slightly.
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭
    JGav - if your diet is deficient in protein then you need to look at the food you are eating, it's just not balanced and healthy.   Endurance athletes don't need protein supplements.
  • HA77HA77 ✭✭✭
    Here's something about Kenyan runners diets. These are sub 2:10 marathon guys running 120 miles a week. And we think we need protein supplements running 50 miles a week.
  • JGav - as long as you're not lactose intolerant or vegan, whey protein is fine. I use MyProtein Impact Whey, which comes in a staggering number of flavours (they sell sample sizes in case you want to try a few and decide which you prefer).
  • HA77 said:
    Here's something about Kenyan runners diets. These are sub 2:10 marathon guys running 120 miles a week. And we think we need protein supplements running 50 miles a week.
    end of thread surely. 
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭
    Pete Holt said:
    HA77 said:
    Here's something about Kenyan runners diets. These are sub 2:10 marathon guys running 120 miles a week. And we think we need protein supplements running 50 miles a week.
    end of thread surely. 


    Pete - I think you're right there.
  • ianbianb ✭✭
    Think about how good they would really be if they had protein supps as well ;)
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