Not able to run 5k thread

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  • Progress:  I start week five of the c25k program.  I'm stoked because I only have a few more weeks to go before I'm done.  After that, I plan to continue adding time by five minutes each week until I get to 5k.  I know I won't be able to do 5k at the end of this program because I'm going for time and not distance.  Once I get the 5k under my belt, I will work on speed.  Right now, I just want to be able to do it.

    How is everyone else doing?

  • I am just about to start the c25K app, fingers crossed it goes well :)
  • I managed 1.77 miles in 25 minutes the other day. That is my best so far after a break from running of about 12 years. I reckon I could run a full 5k, but it would probably take me about any hour lol.
  • I have decided to start running this week, i am 5ft 9 and weigh 145lb. I have been weight lifting and have decent upper body strength but have done pretty much zero cardio in my 27 years. Any tips? i want to do a half marathon at some point! Should i aim to increase or maintain my weight? Looking at the Stillman figures it suggests i should drop a couple lb. I do have a really small frame 6" wrists 27.5" waist do i really need to drop any weight?
  • heya! I'm new :) I took up running to try get a little fitter and to improve my health. I've been doing it a few months now and sometimes I can run 5km, but other times I feel like I am pulling a truck and have to stop and walk at least tiwce. I usually run 2 times a week. Does anyone else have this happen to them? Do I just need to train harder or are there techniques I can use so that I can always run a 5km? (please don't say it involves giving up wine!)
  • Yup...I too tried the C25k programme. Couldn't get past week 3. Like some say, it IS only a guide. 3 weeks ago, I took to just bloody setting out on the treadmill for 5k....and just tried, each successive time, to beat my previous time. My first 5k was done in....oh dear......50 minutes!! That was at a snail's pace of 4.5k per hour, with occasional (wow!) spurts of 6.5k..
    Unfortunately, due to current physical problems to do with Morton's Toe and bunions and biomechanics causing hip problems I am not 5k'ing currently, but am building weak muscles up on cross trainer.
  • <span>Hi there! I did 5k today but it was like a slow jog with intervals of quick walks in between. I think it is about pushing the comfort limit. I was going to start with 2k but then I thought nah lets do it! Pleased with 40 mins. I am running to help my anxiety and Depression.</span>
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    That is brilliant Jammy - well done. I hope you're finding the running really helping you. Always think a good run clears my mind.
  • Hey guys,

    So I bought a Garmin forerunner yesterday and hoping to put it in to use as much as possible there was a time (I am not fit enough at all for this) when I did 3-4, 5K runs in one week and after the 4th I couldn't walk on my left foot (treadmill running) and had to have an X ray so stopped immediately. I put this down to being a total amateur in fact hating running to doing that much running on a treadmill. Any advice would you start off short and keep building it up or maybe do one 5K a week?
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Hi Solid - the general consensus is to start off slowly and build up. That's why something like the C25K programme is so popular as it allows you to sensibly build up to doing a 5K. Doing it that way also allows you to check your progress and hopefully maintain your enthusiasm.

    Doing 3-4 5K runs in a week when you're not used to it would tend to put a bit of stress on your body, so not surprised that something did kind of object. Hopefully the foot problem has now cleared up, but might be worth while checking on your footwear to ensure it's the correct type for you. It would be all very well doing C25K, but if your runners are the problem then it's something that may come back.
  • > @Guarddog said:
    > Hi Solid - the general consensus is to start off slowly and build up. That's why something like the C25K programme is so popular as it allows you to sensibly build up to doing a 5K. Doing it that way also allows you to check your progress and hopefully maintain your enthusiasm.
    >
    > Doing 3-4 5K runs in a week when you're not used to it would tend to put a bit of stress on your body, so not surprised that something did kind of object. Hopefully the foot problem has now cleared up, but might be worth while checking on your footwear to ensure it's the correct type for you. It would be all very well doing C25K, but if your runners are the problem then it's something that may come back.

    Appreciate that thank you! I do most certainly need to look at my running trainers to be honest!
  • I ran 5k for the first time today without stopping or walking. I wasn't expecting to do it, in fact, I'd really given up on the idea and was happy to run/walk through my regular park runs. The difference today was that I asked a friend to come and run it with me and give me some tips. It turns out, that because I was chatting to him, I was forced to keep to a comfortable talking pace, something I'd never been able to do while absorbed in my running music. Up until the 2k mark, and probably the 3k mark I still expected that I would need to slow to a walk at some point, but it turns out I could go the whole 5k at that pace. I suspect I had another couple of K left in me as well! I am 45 years old and over 100kg, so it's a bit a strain to lug myself around, but today's effort was just under 35 minutes.
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Well done Chrismo, that is a fantastic effort and congratulations on your time as well. As you say running with someone and talking at the same time does make sure you keep to a sensible pace. It's something I do with my friend when we schedule an easy run, otherwise we end up going too fast. 

    The good thing is that you now know you can run that distance. A lot of running is in the mind and you'll get confidence from that. I always say your mind is more likely to give up before your body does when it comes to deciding you can't run any further.
  • Hey all!

    I did my first outdoor 5K last night and unusually felt really good like I could of gone further ( was a canal so very flat bar 2 increase) but struggled with injury so didn't want to push it. I did it in 34.51 which isn't too bad.
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Well done solidsneek, 34.51 is a great time.
  • I have been dieting for a few months and have gone from 14 1/2st to 12 1/4st and now want to get fit.
    Someone has recommended joining my local park run which is 5k. I might go along this Saturday. So if I haven't done any running (or exercise in general) for a few years, what time should I aim for.. about 40 minutes?
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭✭
    Abaeron - don't aim for a time.  As you haven't done any exercise, I would suggest that you start near the back and walk briskly, with a little run now and then.   Don't exhaust yourself, enjoy the occasion.  

    If you enjoy it then maybe start doing some training to get fit :)
  • <blockquote class="Quote">
    <div class="QuoteAuthor"><a href="/profile/Abaeron">Abaeron</a> said:</div>
    <div class="QuoteText">I have been dieting for a few months and have gone from 14 1/2st to 12 1/4st and now want to get fit.

    Someone has recommended joining my local park run which is 5k. I might go along this Saturday. So if I haven't done any running (or exercise in general) for a few years, what time should I aim for.. about 40 minutes?

    My first 5k was 37 minutes and that was after completing the c25k so in all honesty, I wouldn't have finished a 5k even walking with the odd burst of jogging without building up first. My advice, for what it's worth, is build up up a 5k slowly over a number of weeks. I liked the c25k but any programme would help you get fit......gradually !</div>
    </blockquote>
  • Hi all! I'm just starting out one the c25k (with the dog). I'm a little nervous because my husband started it a few weeks ago but can already run 5-6k, but I've never really been a very active person so I know I'm going to need the full 9 weeks and it will be a struggle. I currently can run for about 120s before having to stop for a breather (so very out of shape). This has all been prompted by my boss at work asking me if I wanted to join her for a run to the park and back after work 3 days a week (about 4.5k total distance). I know at the moment I can't do this but would really love to be able to!

    I'm 29 and medically well, but I am technically obese with a BMI of 31. I know this is going to make it harder for the joints etc. In the past I have started the c25k twice and gotten to week 4 then stopped. Both times it was because I felt awkward running in front of other people, and so was getting up super early to do my runs before anyone else was up - it just became unsustainable.

    Has anyone else dealt with an overwhelming feeling of silliness when they first started?
  • Hi Lev - I think we all have the capacity to feel self conscious when we do something for the first time, whether it's running, first day at work or trying to ask someone out. 

    Runners come in all shapes, sizes, ages and running styles and it's one of the great things about running in that it's an inclusive community. Other runners will be genuinely pleased to see you out there running and will often give you a cheery wave.

    So well done on starting the C25K and good luck with it.
  • HI solidsneek, I'm no expert so take what you want from this.   I was 15 stone 2 years ago and not able to run 100m without being screwed but recently done a sub 50 minute 10k and weigh around 12 stone. 

    My advice would be, on the treadmill or the road, don't worry about a time or distance just run at a pace that you're comfortable at and something I found free really useful when forced to use a running machine was:never stop if you feel like your knackered, just slow it down.  I found my stamina increased loads, even at slower pace 
  • I’m new to running has anyone got any tips xx
  • <blockquote class="Quote">
    <div class="QuoteAuthor"><a href="/profile/CDurant">CDurant</a> said:</div><div class="QuoteAuthor">
    </div>
    <div class="QuoteText">I’m new to running has anyone got any tips xx</div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">Pace yourself, people burn out quickly if they start to fast.
    </div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">Get shoes that fit and work for you.</div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">Commit to a training plan and that does mean running when you would rather be watching TV.
    </div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">Cycling is the best way to crosstrain period. No impact and great for some recovery.</div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">I personally never did the C25k program as I was fit from other sports but it takes time to adapt so be patient, also eating correctly for me is key but that is for another thread..
    </div><div class="QuoteText">
    </div><div class="QuoteText">Regards
    </div>
    </blockquote>
  • Hi I joined a gym just over a year ago after being pretty unfit and have since joined our local parkrun ( Clacton on sea) I have done about 20.I still find myself getting out of breath very quickly when running even when starting out at a slow pace. I know people say it takes time, but how much time? I thought by now I should be achieving a time of 5k in 30 mins but I'm still struggling to get it under 32 .Am I expecting too much? I am 50 this month and have lost a bit of weight over the last 18 months about 20 pounds. Any tips advice would be appreciated
  • SHADESSHADES ✭✭✭✭
    ruralrob - if you're only running once a week progress will be very slow or negligible.   Run 2 or 3 times a week at a pace slower than your parkrun time gradually building up the distance and you will start to strengthen that aerobic system and improve your endurance
  • > @CDurant said:
    > I’m new to running has anyone got any tips xx

    Late to the party but would still be relevant - slow down! Don't worry about your pace when you're just starting out. Focus on time spent running instead. Run slower than you feel you need to.

    Don't compare yourself to others. Your progress won't be linear and you will have bad runs or bad weeks - don't let them get you down. Stay consistent with your training. Remember why you started.

    My first time attempting 5k (was at a Parkrun) I finished in 46:11. Today I managed to get 29:35, and this is almost purely by increasing my mileage. I ran 8 miles non-stop last Sunday, which to date is my furthest non-stop run.
    Follow my journey from overweight couch potato to marathon runner. I'd like to run a 100 mile ultra-marathon in the future, but am currently working on improving my race times from 5k to full marathon. I will share my training progress, gear and event reviews, as well as training, nutrition and recovery tips.
    www.CouchToRunner.co.uk
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