Beginner at 47

I hadn't done any real exercise since I left school but am relatively fit & a healthy weight, dabbled with the gym now and then and always gravitated towards the treadmill. Invariably I started to run before I could walk, as it were, and so got disillusioned and would stop. Back to sitting on the couch.......
However, my husband had a health scare and we decided to get fit together. So, I started the C25K programme. I'm 6 weeks in now and really enjoying it. I am running indoors, on our treadmill, so have yet to venture outside, but I love the feel of running.
I am getting up ridiculously early most mornings so that I can run before going to work. I find on the days that I get up later and don't run, that I feel moody & sluggish.
I do find, though, that I feel that I want to run faster. Should I do this or should I carry on jogging at a slower pace until I have completed the full C25K sessions? Jogging at a slower pace seems to feel more laborious and heavy than when I run slightly faster.

Comments

  • JGavJGav ✭✭✭
    Running slowly can be harder than going slightly quicker (well it is for me).  You are building up leg strength which should help avoid injury.  If you're enjoying what you're doing and staying injury free I'd stick with it.  

    It's nice weather outside so go out, it's much more interesting.
  • ThanksJGav. I don't feel confident enough to go out running on my own yet, so will stick with the treadmill. If my husband gets the ok to start running again then we may venture out together.
  • Once you've done the 5k make sure you get out and do a parkrun. Lots of fun and a perfect way to start your Saturdays. 
  • Thanks Cougies, will see if there's one near me.
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited April 30
    Word is that 47 is the new 37.
    Whitedog said:

    I do find, though, that I feel that I want to run faster. Should I do this or should I carry on jogging at a slower pace until I have completed the full C25K sessions? Jogging at a slower pace seems to feel more laborious and heavy than when I run slightly faster.
    Resist the urge to go faster until you've completed C25K. You're basically building an aerobic foundation and strengthening muscles and tendons. After that you can include some cheeky 30-45s pickups (strides) where you're pushing yourself during your runs.

    As per Cougie's advice, do a Parkrun after C25K. You won't need your other half to be there as it's a supportive and motivational environment.
  • WhitedogWhitedog ✭✭
    Thanks Ynnec
    :-) Still life in the old girl yet.
    Thanks for the advice, will try that.
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Agree with all that's been said Whitedog. Follow the C25K programme to the end. It's designed to introduce you to running without over stressing the important bits (as Ynnec says the muscles and tendons). 

    I would mention a word of caution, though. Running on a treadmill is something of a different experience to running outside. I started on a treadmill and when I eventually moved outside I found it harder. I didn't get the 'bounce' I got from the treadmill and movement seemed a lot tougher due to the different muscles being engaged (the treadmill kind of pulls you along so you don't need to generate so much movement). This was only a problem initially and after a short while I realised that running outside was far better than on a treadmill. So just be aware once you are ready to explore the wide world of running it may seem a bit harder to begin with.

    Good luck.
  • WhitedogWhitedog ✭✭
    Thanks Guarddog,
    Yes, I've been told that and, to be honest, kind of knew it would be harder outside. That's fine, I'm enjoying myself at the moment. Will complete the programme, may even do it again at a faster pace and then try outside. I'm in no rush :smiley:
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Whitedog said:
    I'm in no rush :smiley:
    Those are the wisest words you can say Whitedog  :) - You've hopefully got over 30 years of running to look forward to.
  • this is maybe a stupid question but is a "Parkrun" a specific thing, or literally just going for a run in a local park? I have seen a few people use the term and just wanted to check
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited June 13
    this is maybe a stupid question but is a "Parkrun" a specific thing, or literally just going for a run in a local park? I have seen a few people use the term and just wanted to check
    https://www.parkrun.org.uk/

    As per the above link they're 5k timed runs that tend to happen in parkland but there's no specific mandate e.g. I did Hereford Parkrun last week and it's two inner loops of the Racecourse.

    Register (it's free), print out your barcode, choose one and enjoy!
  • > @Ynnec said:
    > Sophieanne said:
    >
    >
    > this is maybe a stupid question but is a "Parkrun" a specific thing, or literally just going for a run in a local park? I have seen a few people use the term and just wanted to check
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > https://www.parkrun.org.uk/
    >
    > As per the above link they're 5k timed runs that tend to happen in parkland but there's no specific mandate e.g. I did Hereford Parkrun last week and it's two inner loops of the Racecourse.
    >
    > Register (it's free), print out your barcode, choose one and enjoy!



    ahhh cool! Don't think I am there just yet haha, but definitely good to know :) Thank you!
  • GuarddogGuarddog ✭✭✭
    Parkrun is very inclusive and supportive of all people who participate, regardless of pace, age, gender, etc. Good luck with getting to the point where you feel you can do it, Sophieanne.
  • TTTT ✭✭✭
    Sophieanne, Parkrun is massively inclusive, often find people walking with buggies, wheelchairs, dogs (having said that was once overtaken by person pushing a double buggy with what looked like two year old twins inside), does not matter how fast or slow you go it is the taking part. If you can walk/run 5km then you are ready for Parkrun and parkrun is ready for you! 
  • ooh, interesting.... thanks for the info! Maybe I will give it a go! :smile:
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