My Running Technique is totally wrong

Hi,

I've just noticed that I run terribly and I reckon it be the cause of all my injuries and pains, if not alot of them.

I just throw my left leg down and pound off it, I don't actually make a running motion with it. My kneecap has hurt the last few days and previously at xmas I got shin splints and mortons neuroma (granted that was my other foot!)

I'm wondering is there any way I could improve my running strides easily, so that I'm not just throwing my leg down?

When I made a concious effort to run on both legs I was a lot faster and running more freely. I couldnt keep doing it and got tired. Perhaps because of using muscles in my leg im not use to?

I should point im only running like 3mile at the minute. Any advice on how to improve my stride pattern and how I run better would be much appreciated.

Comments

  • stutyrstutyr ✭✭✭

    I'd recommend the book 'Chi Running' for helping understand how to improve your technique. 

    I'm not really an advocate of the technique, and I'm not convinced of everything said in the book.  However I did find that after reading it I looked at my posture, breathing etc and I was able to adapt the suggested technique to suit me.  I also became more aware of "listening" to my body during a run and correcting the change in posture that happened with increasing tiredness.

  • There are a whole host of different styles and you'll find that the followers of each style will consider their's the best. To reduce the strain on your joints, you'll typically want your foot to land as close as possible to your centre of gravity. It sounds like you're over-striding and therefore putting an unnecessary amount of pressure on your knees.

    Try leaning forwards slightly and think about your feet succumbing to gravity, rather than slamming it down. Also try to envisage you pushing off, rather than extending forwards.

    It may take a while, but I'm almost certain it'll reduce the woe-factor.

  • SqueakzSqueakz ✭✭✭
    I would advise the book Natural Running, its a really good book which addresses how we run and what it tells us. It is a fantastic read.
  • Just go to the library and get a running book that has a chapter on improving your technique. Introduce the new techniques bit by bit until they become second nature
  • I'm kind of with NLR here. It's really difficult to change how you run, so finding a few basic items and working on them, just one or two at a time for a while, before introducing other things, is probably the best approach.

    Also, I would swap your runs for "drills" maybe once a week. From what you've described, it would probably be worth starting by swapping one of your runs with a session of 100metre repeats. But not trying to sprint the 100 metres nor trying to stretch out the stride, simply trying to run evenly (on both legs) for a 100 metres, then a [evenly balanced] walk / jog back, then repeat, as many times as you feel comfortable. Best done on a nice flat surface, and preferably not pavement / road. It's a technique I used, which helped a lot as I "naturally" tend to run rather one-sided due to old rugby injuries(!)

    Good luck with it!
  • Google or check out the book: Running Technique

    I published this eBook a month or so back.  It's written with the novice or experienced runner in mind in plain English.  There's plenty of advice about how you should run and this book also explains how to train for better technique using a combination of strength and coordination work, mental cues and making some alterations to your running program.

     Good luck

     Brian

  • Hi

    My running was horrific and i was plagued with nearly everything a runner can get,pronation, aching hips, shin splints etc... but i was recommended to read the Chi Running by danny dreyer and it has helped me so much,i have learnt to lean when i run not be bolt upright, not to land on my heel,make sure my feet don't land in front of me, not to cross my arms and lots more, basically what he is stating in the book is that you need to relax everything, one good piece of advice i swear by is Leg Drains, when you have been for a run, and your legs feel heavy,lie on the floor and put your legs against a wall in front, relax for 3mins they squeeze your claves like you are wringing out a flannel,doit downwards,  i swear your legs will feel better after...(works for me anyway ! image

    I know everyone has different ways on how to run, its just finding which is best for you, but i highly recommend chirunning 

    <iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rkUqkdPQHis" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Nikki image

  • Hi

    My running was horrific and i was plagued with nearly everything a runner can get,pronation, aching hips, shin splints etc... but i was recommended to read the Chi Running by danny dreyer and it has helped me so much,i have learnt to lean when i run not be bolt upright, not to land on my heel,make sure my feet don't land in front of me, not to cross my arms and lots more, basically what he is stating in the book is that you need to relax everything, one good piece of advice i swear by is Leg Drains, when you have been for a run, and your legs feel heavy,lie on the floor and put your legs against a wall in front, relax for 3mins they squeeze your claves like you are wringing out a flannel,doit downwards,  i swear your legs will feel better after...(works for me anyway ! image

    I know everyone has different ways on how to run, its just finding which is best for you, but i highly recommend chirunning 

    Check out the film below, hope this helps somewhat image 

    http://www.youtube.com/embed/rkUqkdPQHis

    Nikki image

  • Say that againimage
  • There's an article in this months RW about the Alexander technique. I wonder if that might help?
  • Also it is worth investigating whether a barefoot running session may improve your technique. Looking forward to trying that myself as the new Inov8 Evoskins are about to hit the market at around half the price of Vibram 5 fingers.
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