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Brian Rothbart ✭✭

This is what I believe to be the etiology of an ascending short leg syndrome based on several of my research projects (below cited): Two abnormal genetically inherited foot structures (the PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity and Rothbarts Foot) force the feet to abnormally (gravity drive) pronate during ambulation (Rothbart 1988, 2002, 2006): • Abnormal foot pronation drives the innominate bones anteriorly (1988, 2002, 2006). • The more anteriorly rotated innominate bone being ipsilateral (same side) as the more pronated foot (2006). • Anterior rotation of the innominate bone displaces its' acetabulum cephalad and posteriorly (Rothbart 2006). • This functionally shortens both legs and hyperextends both knees. • The resulting functional short leg being ipsilateral to the more anteriorly displaced innominate bone. I view the anteriorly rotated innominate bones as one pathomechanical event in a series of pathomechanical events, initiated by an abnormal inherited foot structure.

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Brian Rothbart
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  • This is what I believe to be the etiology of an ascending short leg syndrome based on several of my research projects (below cited):

    Two abnormal genetically inherited foot structures (the PreClinical Clubfoot Deformity and Rothbarts Foot) force the feet to abnormally (gravity drive) pronate during ambulation (Rothbart 1988, 2002, 2006):
    • Abnormal foot pronation drives the innominate bones anteriorly (1988, 2002, 2006).
    • The more anteriorly rotated innominate bone being ipsilateral (same side) as the more pronated foot (2006).
    • Anterior rotation of the innominate bone displaces its' acetabulum cephalad and posteriorly (Rothbart 2006).
    • This functionally shortens both legs and hyperextends both knees.
    • The resulting functional short leg being ipsilateral to the more anteriorly displaced innominate bone.

    I view the anteriorly rotated innominate bones as one pathomechanical event in a series of pathomechanical events, initiated by an abnormal inherited foot structure.
    August 15