How many miles do you run a week ?

How many miles do you run a week?

Its just that i've been reading my new book and there's a chap in there that used to bang out 160 miles a weeks !! obviously an elite runner but still thats amazing.  Us normal people who work and have other commitments struggle sometimes just to find the time..

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Comments

  • What exactly is this running thing that you speak of, oh wise one? image

  • What book is this then????



    Just done 70mile this week. Happy though.
  • Didn't stop Ron Hill doing 100 miles plus a week or anyone else who had purpose and planning in their lives. Normal people are on average a disorganised mess with too many commitments of their own making to deal with. 

  • Isn't that just real life then? Work, family, other interests outside of running?

    Ron Hill is male and I doubt that he had the same family commitments as most women as it usually comes down to them to care for offspring and parents.

    I think rthat most people have purpose and planning in their lives it's just that running really doesn't come that high on the priority list.

  • Its in Advanced marathoning

  • Ashman- oooooh you mean Peter snell I think thats who you mean anyway.



    To be fair Ricf has a good point about life not stopping him.
  • T.M, you clearly haven't read Ron Hills autobiography 'The Long Hard Road' Volume one and two. Doubt he had family commitments!, he had plenty of those. 

  • RicF wrote (see)
     Normal people are on average a disorganised mess

     

    T.mouse wrote (see)

    most people have purpose and planning in their lives


    I'm confused now.

  • Even at 6min miles that's 16 hours a week. To cover that distance I would have to run at 11min miles and I would be looking at 30 hours a week and that doesn't include showering.



    I'm currently doing 32miles a week 4.5, 10, and 18. I should do more but probably like a lot of people 12hours of my day is away from home and I often work weekends.
  • I do a commute, a working day, and work some weekends.  There's Dad's taxi and the dinner to put on the table.  I know I can fit 70 miles in a week and still feel like I was just being lazy some days.  Right now I'm doing about 40 and feeling exceptionally lazy.  It isn't that you can't do it, it's just whether you really want to.  Also, it helps if the office has a shower.

  • T.mouse wrote (see)

    Isn't that just real life then? Work, family, other interests outside of running?

    Ron Hill is male and I doubt that he had the same family commitments as most women as it usually comes down to them to care for offspring and parents. I think rthat most people have purpose and planning in their lives it's just that running really doesn't come that high on the priority list.

    Cripes there's some bitterness in this post.

    Are you like the guys at my work who say I beat them only because they have "Lives" and don't run image

  • I run 150 miles per week and have a harem of women to do all my laundry and cooking, of which there is much.

  • Sorry Ratzer, it takes me 1:45 to run 10miles. 15minutes to cooldown, shower and change is 2hours a day. Add that to 12hours of commute/work, an hour cooking and eating, that gives me 9 hours a day to sleep and get ready for work. Assuming the wife is in to look after the kids, if she's out then there is nowhere to fit the 2hours in.



    For some people that sort of dedication is just not possible.
  • I've been told by someone that I'm essentially a full time runner. (This was from a guy with a marathon pb of sub 2:30 but now with too many commitments, not enough time, an inordinate sense of entitlement, a wife who needs milking, not enough money, too many debts, too many kids, too much weight on his guts and a sore leg) Well we all make choices. I just avoided all his.

  • He's wrong then. Anything less than 35hours a week is part time.
  • As the voice of the lone female who runs the family as well as for pleasure, I manage a modest 25-30 miles a week. I am beginning to panic about all these dark nights. I live in the middle of the countryside and do not know when I will train. Help.

  • It must be hard to fit "high", let's say 50miles a week in if you have a busy job, long commute, family, kids etc.

    However, you make the decisions about what's most important to you, and work from that. Making the daily run as much a part of the day as going to bed, or brushing your teeth is key.

    I remember thinking 25miles was a lot to fit in, and now i think anything under 50miles a week when not injured is incredibly low. Funny how things change

  • Mary Mary wrote (see)

    As the voice of the lone female who runs the family as well as for pleasure, I manage a modest 25-30 miles a week. I am beginning to panic about all these dark nights. I live in the middle of the countryside and do not know when I will train. Help.

    Sounds like a reasonable request. Reminds me of the time when as a relatively new runner I was asked if I would run with a young lady to stop her being hassled by guys in cars etc especially at night. A bit of a shock to discover the young lady had just appeared on the cover of Athletics Weekly.

  • I have found a sneeky way round it and volenteered to help with the cross country running at work( i work in a school). The only female mad enough. I love it and will show the boys what we girlies are made of!!

  • Ron Hill ran to and from work every day - so his commute got him miles. It's an excellent idea but not practical for everyone. 

  • Ultra cougie, sorry but you couldn't be more wrong there about it not being practical for anyone not so long ago I was regurlarly spending about 20-25mins driving home from work 10 mins changing then doing a regurlar 6-7mile run in the evening.



    One day it occured to me to cut out the driving bit get changed at work then run 7miles home from work this way I get the same running miles but get to sit down for tea at 9:30pm rather than 10:30ish.



    No longer in that job because of takin up full time running but thats beside the point. Alot of people can fit it in if they are really determined or think outside the box.



    I found people who dont want to run seem to have an excuse for every eventuality.



    I want to run but:

    My feet ache from work

    I'm hungry

    Its cold out

    Its raining

    I'm hungry

    I'm hungover

    I cant run for a bus

    People might see me

    I'm to slow

    I dont have anyone to run with

    My shoes are gettin worn out

    I heard them all before.



    If someone was just honest an said "i dont want to to run" I would respect them more but I cant be doin with excuses from people who "want" to run
  • I would love to run to and from work, but it's 44 miles each way and some nights it takes 2 hours to drive that. Getting home at 8pm then running 10miles is ok once or twice a week.



    If I really wanted to run 70miles a week I would buy a smaller house, get a local job and sell my family. It's not an excuse, it's just how things are.
  • Working in a school = 14 weeks not working?

  • Andy - I said not practical for everyone. Not anyone. Of course people can fit in plenty of miles but it depends on their situation.
  • Any, what is full time running, how can you do this?
  • To be fair, not everyone can be totally single minded towards their goals. 30 years back I used to spend every spare moment fishing; now there's an activity that eats up time, not just minutes but whole days. As for ambition, at the time there was a fellow who wrote in a book, "Lack of time and money is no excuse to get to the top in Carp fishing", brutal stuff. He himself changed his job, moved house etc, to accommodate this. And deemed that others should do the same. 

    If there was an aspect of running training that I've found attractive and that is the sheer brevity of it. I don't need hours and hours every day to do it. I would hazzard a guess that the lack of time aspect has more to do with other people in the complaintifs life than real lack of time. A relative of mine complains all the time about having no time for this and that, but the reason is having a really busy social diary, a life full of self inflicted appointments and commitments.

  • My belief is that life is defined by which goal you choose to attack. If you have a family and responsibility I personally would not feel able to devote all of my energy into a pursuit that doesn't benefit the whole family.

    If you ever read Ghost Runner, being the best runner (Carp fisherman, cyclist etc....) that you can be, would inevitably come at a cost to your family.

    To me running is what I enjoy, and that can be 10 miles or 40 miles per week, depending on time, and I find I can only really enjoy it when everything else is taken care of.
  • Monday Hill training session to the top of Everest and and back.

    Tuesday Sprint session trying to keep up with a Ferarri.

    Wednesday 150 mile threshold run.

    Thursday 60 mile recovery run.

    Friday Rest day

    Saturday 120 miles off road.

    Sunday 736 and a half miles long slow run.

  • What I really do.

    Thursday Two and a half miles.

    Sunday 5 miles.

  • Stevie G . wrote (see)
    T.mouse wrote (see)
    Isn't that just real life then? Work, family, other interests outside of running? Ron Hill is male and I doubt that he had the same family commitments as most women as it usually comes down to them to care for offspring and parents. I think rthat most people have purpose and planning in their lives it's just that running really doesn't come that high on the priority list.

    Cripes there's some bitterness in this post.

    Are you like the guys at my work who say I beat them only because they have "Lives" and don't run image

    I don't think this comes across as bitterness, just as average facts.

    Oh, at the moment I run about 35 miles a week. image

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