Something for the Grammar Nazis

Guardian grammar quiz.

Managed 12 out of 14, with some educated guesswork.

Can someone explain the answer to number 8, and also what a "gerund" is?

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Comments

  • no 8 - unless you know what abstract and collective mean, you're pretty bolloxed!

     

  • I got 14 (do we have a smug emoticon?)

    Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

    A gerund is a verb in the participle form (-ing) but operating as a noun. As in, what do you think of my running? (I think that's right, someone smarter or more pedantic will be along shortly).

  • 10. I don't remember any of this from school. I suspect none of it was invented back then.
  • Yoohoo, Wilkie, over here sweetie image

  • Muttley wrote (see)

    Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

    Facepalm.

    I forgot sometimes words have two meanings.

  • Tom77 wrote (see)
    Muttley wrote (see)
    Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.

    Facepalm.

    I forgot sometimes words have two meanings.

    that would make you a bit pissed - or maybe pissed.... image

  • The answer to number 8 is because "Pride" can be both a collective noun (as in a pride of lions), or an abstract noun (as in pride before a fall).

    I had to have 'gerund' explained to me. Apparently it's a noun that can be used as a verb e.g. Teacher becomes Teaching.

     

    Oops... cross post with all of the above.

  • Which is pretty much what I said, innit?

  • some people are just too slow these days eh Mutts??

  • There were only 2 posts when I strated typing image

     

  • JF gets a good gerundive spanking for not paying attention image

  • Muttley wrote (see)

     

    Pride is abstract, as in a sense of pride. And collective, as in a pride of lions.  


    D'oh!  12, because I was only considering a single meaning of pride (as in take pride) and trying to work out whether it was both abstract and collective, and because I didn't know what a gerund was until I Googled it just now.

    Arse!

  • 13 - I wasn't sure about the gerund either.

    And to be pedantic....  is the first question really about grammar?  Is it not just understanding of what a word means?

  • Wilkie, I declare you a second-degree grammar nazi, taking a grammar quiz to task!  (Can you imagine how many times they checked this article before it went to print?!)

  • In the first question you have to identify the word that is in the role of antonym, so yes I would argue that it is a grammar question.

  • I suppose, I'd overlooked the fact that you do have to know what an antonym is!

  • Stray comma there, Wilkie image

  • The 'I suppose' was saying that I agreed with you (I suppose you are right), the rest of the sentence was why I agreed with you.

     

  • 13 out of 14. Fuck you, Lynne Truss.

  • I got 11.
    Thats about 6 more than I think I'd get...

  • I also got 11, more encouragingly, my 12 year old got 14!

  • Dustin wrote (see)

    Thats about 6 more than I think I'd get...

    I believe that should be "than I thought I'd get" .... what with this being a grammar Nazi thread and all that ... image

    And well done to CB69's young 'un!

  • 12/14 not bad for a foreigner image

  • 13. Didn't know what a gerrund is but figured the other two would be verb and adj. So guessed right.

    Got no.13 wrong - propositional phrase or summat.
  • 10. Will ask my primary teaching boyfirend tomorrow and hope he gets them all!

  • I did rather badly, as I only scored 11/14. Damn my secondary modern schooling. image

  • Dammit, I only got 13 because for some reason I didn't SEE question 1 so didn't answer it!

  • Wilkie wrote (see)

    The 'I suppose' was saying that I agreed with you (I suppose you are right), the rest of the sentence was why I agreed with you.

     

    should have been a semi-colon really image

  • 2 wrong - the Pride one (trick question !) and the active voice one which I hadn't a clue about.   The rest, I wasn't 100% certain on all of them but you can kind of work most of them out can't you.   I knew gerunds ended in ing - no idea how - didn't know what one was.

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