Orthotic friendly shoes....

MacMac ✭✭✭
According to my findings at club level and what I have read the neutral runners are a minority (despite what some like to think!) The fact is that most of us need some form of correction and usually in the form of orthotics.
This being the case then why do'nt shoe manufacturers produce a shoe that will actually be deep enough to accomodate orthotics? I mean its not bloody rocket science is it? All they have to do is make the upper a little deeper and Bob's your Badger! But oooh noooo thats too easy, why not kid us all into thinking that us "deformed" people are a minority, unlike those god like elite and holy "neutral" runners!!!
The Asics Gel Cumulus is one of the only shoes that will do this, there may be others (Not many I'll bet) but probably through accident rather than design.
For example why dont Reebok make their new "Pump 2" a little deeper so that orthotic wearers can try them? But Ooh noo according to Reebok "Their not for you then" (quote)
It really P*sses me off that one of the most common type of runner (orthotics) are the least catered for, whats the matter with shoe makers? Don't they want our business? Its all very well saying that there are lots of "support" shoes on the market, maybee so but they are usually not suited for orthotics and sometimes can upset the effects of orthotics. Does anyone else share my frustration or am I contrary to my belief the only non "neutral runner on the planet?????
Thanks for listening.

Mac (I feel better now!)

Comments

  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    And....breathe....

    :o)


    I wear Superfeet insoles (as advised by my chiropractor who said they were all I needed and at £30 instead of £300 for custom orthos who was I to argue), and they fit fine in all the shoes I've tried so far, once the insole is removed.


    Dunno about "most" of us needing orthotics though. Most peeps I know don't wear them.
  • I use orthotics and agree that the depth of running shoes (all footwear, in fact) can be a problem.

    I currently run in Asics 2090s and the padding at the back of each shoe has worn away almost totally because my foot is raised by the orthotic insoles (I've removed the standard ones, obviously) and my heel now rubs at the area which, I assume, is designed to support the achilles tendon.

    I reckon there's probably another 300km or so left in my 2090s, but I might have to replace them sooner simply because the padding has deteriorated too much. Every time I take my shoes off after a long run there are pieces of foam entangled in my socks!
  • I wear Brooks Illusions....not had a problem with my orthotics in them...





    <runs out, thinking this was not what mac wanted to her in his ranty mode>
  • debbodebbo ✭✭✭
    RG - I wear orthotics in 2090s too - is that why the padding at the back wears away?! I thought it was just what happened when the shoes started to wear out.
  • I wear orthotics in 2100s, and haven't had this problem with the back wearing out - so far. I've done about 170 miles in them so far.
  • I wear orthotics (hard carbon fibre ones) in 2100s and no problems at all.
  • My podiatrist recommended I wear Brooks Adrenaline GTS with my orthotics.
  • I wear othoses in Mizunos - Mercury, Maverick -no problems once I remove the insole.
  • Saucony and Mizuno and Brooks have all worked for me with them...
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    It's a damn conspiracy thats what it is!!!!!

    I wear Brooks adreneline GTS too and I admit they are the best of the ones I've tried so far. However my point is that why can't I find a pair of lightweight shoes, possibly neutral/mild support (so's to let my orthotics do their job)that are also deep enough to accomodate my orthotics? Why must I submit to wearing 380-400g shoes (aka bricks)in order to be able to wear my orthotics. Afterall it's bad enough having to use orthotics without having to use heavier shoes as well!
    For example I tried on (without my orthotics) a pair of New Balance 900's, they felt great, really comfy and"light" however I proceeded to spontaneously combust when I found that they were far to shallow to take orthotics!!! AAAARRRRRGGGGGG!!!!!!
    Do competetive runners (the kind who need/want lightweight shoes) not also wear orthotics? If so why cant I find a lighter pair that will take them?? eh? eh? eh?
    Oh yes and my toes hurt now too and thats all your fault as well!

    Thanks you've all been great,

    Mac.
  • I have also got a pair of Saucony Fastwich (I had delusions of faster running) which work fine with the orthoses.

    Might be worth a look.

    I dont really understand why your orthoses wont fit - in all my shoes they basically replace the insole so there isnt a fit problem.
  • Welsh AlexWelsh Alex ✭✭✭

    Etonic do shoes with 2 layers of footbed so if you need to put and orthotic in you can take out the lower level to make room.

    Got a pair of etonic shoes and they are superb.
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    Problem is guys that my orthotics are 3/4 lenght not full. I have tried removing the insoles but I just can't get on with it! The toe box is then very uncomfortable! I have even tried fixing a piece of insole from some old running shoes and thats even worse as the "join" drives me potty! and keeps coming off anyway! The angle of the foot within the shoe is also steepened and that causes me toes problems (which I still have on higher mileage runs!)
    So you see winging is my only joy in life since my running is quiet obviously ruined...Ruined...RUINED I TELL YA!!!!!

    Sorry....where was I? ah yes! I've heard of the fastwitch but was also told they would not take orthotics very well and that they were not for everyday training runs etc more for races etc....(are they up to high mileage for a 13st chap?) If thats not the case then maybee they're worth a looksey?

    But the main problem is that I need a pair that are deep enough WITHOUT removing the insole. (Did you say Etonic? What model?)

    Gibber...rant....foam at mouth.......(ouch me bloody toe!)


    Mac.
  • Welsh AlexWelsh Alex ✭✭✭

    Etonic ER3241.

    I am a neurtal runner but they are great for me. Missus is an o.p. and they work well for her too.

    http://www.etonic.com/running/run_product.aspx?ID=1&play=1
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    Looks fine but how much do they weigh? Can't find that on the website.

    Mac.
  • Hmmm who sold you 3/4 lengths for running shoes. That's where your problem lies, not with the shoes IMHO.

    djb
  • Mac

    I use the Sofe Sole Graphite orthotic for my overpronating flat feet together with the Nike Air Pegasus. The orthotic is quite thick, the Pegasus quite roomy. Together they make a good combination. The original sockliner has to be removed though - standard instructions for all orthotic wearers. You will probably not find shoes which are deep enough to accommodate both the original sock liner + your orthotics, so perish that thought. Besides, the orthotics are designed to work on their own to control motion - not in conjunction with the sockliner.

    The other suggestion is to get full length orthotic, since you are not comfortable with the 3/4 length one. I once used a 3/4 length orthotic by cutting the top end of the original sockliner and joining it to the orthotic with instant glue. Unlike your experience, this has worked well for me. I dont feel the joint at all and it has stayed in place for the last 2 years - no problems!
  • Yep, go get a decent set of full length orthotics and they become your insoles for ALL your shoes (running, ski boots, bike shoes, work shoes, etc). You just ditch the manufacturers insoles.

    Get 2 pairs of orthoses and its easier to manage.

    Then Bobs your badger!

    If you go for orthoses on top of the original insoles my guess is that stability may be a problem and the risk of twisted ankle would increase.

  • Welsh AlexWelsh Alex ✭✭✭

    Don't know on the weight of the etonic hybrid. I have mailed them to find out. They don't feel heavy or light to me.

    "Etonic Hybrid Men. The extremely lightweight Hybrid was voted Best New Shoe in the Running Networks 2005 Spring Shoe Review"
  • My orthotics were originally 3/4 length. I found I couldn't get on with them. So my podiatrist sent them back to the manufacturer, who refurnished them with a full length covering. No problems since...
  • Horses for courses - my orthotics are 3/4 length which I wear on top of 2100 insoles and have no problems. After a few runs, the orthotic embeds itself into the insole making a very stable platform for running.
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    Thanks guys, lots of advice there then.

    I'm begining to think that my orthotics are quiet possibly CRAP!

    Never been totally conviced they were right.
    I've had them over two years now so maybee it's time to get re-assessed by a different Pod' ? Afterall theres some credence to the theory that not ALL shoes can be unsuitable for me so maybee, just maybee my orthotics are the root of all evil in the universe and need to be totally and utterly destroyed!
    I have about 4mm leg length differece so I can't even stop using them and try stability shoes. I get arch blisters when I do anyway.

    I just want to slip on the old shoes and go for a run without getting blisters or sore knees/hips, is that too much to ask????

    Mac. (Now sulking and mumbling to himself in a dark corner somewhere!)
  • I have 1/2 length orthotics. Although they have a cover over them making them like insoles so I do not need to wear any insoles whatsoever.

    I wear kayanos at the moment with no problems. Also been recommended 2100's and Cumulus (I only look for Asics).
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    This cover? Is it an "add on" or is it part of the orthotic?

    mac.
  • I use 2/3 length orthotics in my 3 pairs of Saucony Omni 3's and in one pair the padding has a hole worn in it, in the others its not a problem. The orthotics have a lower profile that forms a heel so that may help them stay in position, I do remember them slipping when new but even then only when running down steep hills. I have 2 pairs of Omni 4's on the way so it'll be interesting to see any difference.
  • It's an add on but done by the pod.

    I think my orthotic is made out of SVA. The cover is a similar material to what insoles are made out of (probably a less dense SVA as it's softer). It's stuck on top of the orthotic meaning an insole isn't needed. I think if the pod was feeling extravagant you could also put some material over the cover to make it look exactly like an insole.
  • MacMac ✭✭✭
    I've been waiting 12 years for an answer to my last question...which was....which was....errr.....
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