Misrepresentation...

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Comments

  • Many, many years ago I worked in the Inland Revenue. Nothing important (20 years ago).  I had various threats. Got thumped once, and had fun times when we had to inspect our cars before leaving the office due to bomb threats... It's quite interesting having look underneath your car for things attached to it......

    Yeah those were the days....  Let me think.... nahh on second thoughts that wasn't really fun.

     

  • Snap! wrote (see)

    You're probably right. When I was 7, i got in some trouble at school. My Mum took me to the local police station and had them lock me in a cell for a day. The police were happy to do it. The same officer that put me in the cell, PC Gilkes, was the officer that came to our school to talk to the class every term - EVERY TERM.

    That was 36 years ago. How times change. Tough job.

     

    can't believe that you were do badly behaved that your parents couldn't find a way to teach you a lesson at home without resorting to wasting the polices time.......

    can you imagine what would have happened if at 7 you had suffered a panic attack in a cell ( or had been molested by your cell mate )........a panic attack bringing on a asthma attack or similar and then you dying or being hospitilised......

    all because your parents were too lazy to teach you the correct behaviourimage

  • Barkles wrote (see)

    I think the sort of targets we are talking about here iare different to targetting behaviour, I think that is more likely to be - 'clear 12 cases off your desk in a shift, no matter what they've done', type of targets.

    Precisely. 

    Also on my OH's force there are targets on crime prevention so they have a dedicated neghbourhood team working in the community. This worked but who do you think were the first team under threat of being disbanded/redundancy as victims of their own success?

     

  • First hand experience?

    Well then, some specific examples, rather than general, sweeping and insulting statements would be appreciated.

    I, like you, have experience of the public and private sector and I would not like to promote or defend either; in general.

    I have worked with highly motivated and professional people.... and some complete w**kers.

    When you work hard and take pride in your work and still get slagged off by people who base their opinion on..... what, exactly?

     

  • My parents were far from lazy. Did me a world of good.

  • What do the police actually do these days?

  • Well, today two WPC's were at my next door neighbour's house. They're completely mad (neighbours, not police) so we know where some of them were.

  • Taxi Driver wrote (see)

    What do the police actually do these days?

    Maybe you should ask April Jones's parents what they do.

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)

    Low levels of basic competence, poor decision making, and almost non-existent leadership would be the main issues for me. This combined with a refusal to acknowledge that private sector help would make a better service, instead of the old "leave us to do our job" routine, embrace a bit of change and get back to some decent service

    More general, sweeping and insulting statements....

    If the private sector is always better, maybe you could explain what went wrong at Railtrack?

  • Incompetence, poor decision making and non-existent leadership are indeed issues that affect some in the public sector. But they are not endemic, they are individual failings to be found equally in the private sector. But why are such negative issues being focused on when there are far more actual examples of great work in both sectors?

    You should also take account that the public sector has to work to the whims of their political masters who are a fickle lot and often make "vote winning" changes to services that are impractical and unworkable - don't just blame the workers!

  • Nick, is there anyone you DO respect?

  • Taxi Driver wrote (see)

    What do the police actually do these days?

    Pretty much all the stuff I wouldn't want to do.  Dealing with the violent, the irresponsible, the mad, and the self-important. Telling relatives after someone has died in a traffic accident. Handling domestic fights. Dealing with drunks. Dealing with major organised crime gangs who wouldn't hesitate to kill them. Dealing with self-righteous naive middle class "protestors" throwing fire extinguishers off rooftops. I've worked with them, I've been on the receiving end of their help, and I've on occasion been ticked off by them. I've never found them to be less than professional.

  • Nick - sorry but those really are ridiculous generalisations about the police. You must know that.

    Have you even considered all the successful prosecutions, often of some very nasty people, that go through our courts every week? All the result of meticulous police work - and if you knew how some of the procedures worked in getting suspects and evidence to court you'd respect their patience and determination in what they do. 

     

     

  • Not to mention the masses of teachers who put in the extra hours, very often in those fabulous holidays they have, to ensure that our children have the very best education that can be provided on the hellishly tight budgets and targets that are provided them, most of whom have little in the way of respect for their teachers, thanks in no small part to the blinkered opinions that you have so far espoused.  I've worked in schools before - there is absolutely no way I'd want any of my children to put themselves in that environment as a profession.  It's relentless.

    And as an ex NHS employee, with friends on the front line of the police - don't even get me started, because you clearly haven't got a clue what we in the public service have to put up with on a daily basis, not just from patients and service users with your Daily Mail kind of attitude, but from the managers who are dictated to from on high.

    You really are like a very sad 70's stuck record.  Why don't you actually look at some figures, if you did you'd see that the corrupt few are just that - few, but you're more than happy to throw everyone in to the *down with the establishment* pot.  But come the revolution you'll be one of the many crying in the corner begging for help.

  • Go Wolfie!  Freedom for Tooting!

     

     

  • You wouldn't be "making it happen" Nick, revolutionary leaders have to be visionaries, not just general dissatisfied whingers. Your arguments are neither strong enough, focussed enough, nor persuasive enough and you are fundamentally wrong about who you perceive to be the "enemy" and what  "the problem" is. Were you to succeed you, and others like you, would find this out at first hand and not have a clue about what to do next.

    You would also find out very quickly what the police do once they are not there not doing it! 

  • Can the Police use heavy handed tactics to get a result and still be considered good? I think so. But a dishonest Police officer is untenable.

    When some people think of the Police as just members of another gang, there's bound to be an attitude problem.

     

  • Nick Windsor 4 wrote (see)
    Screamapillar wrote (see)
    Nick - sorry but those really are ridiculous generalisations about the police. You must know that. Have you even considered all the successful prosecutions, often of some very nasty people, that go through our courts every week? All the result of meticulous police work - and if you knew how some of the procedures worked in getting suspects and evidence to court you'd respect their patience and determination in what they do.     

    As conceded earlier there must be some people doing a job, point is they are led by fools but don't quite see it, they all believe change is bad because their bosses tell them that.

    wheres the new thinking

    Where do you get this idea?This is the absolute opposite of the truth! Change is heavily promoted. Change is "good" even when it isn't and there is often change for the sake of change - it's what makes bosses look busy, like they are doing something, it's how they got noticed and make their mark. And it's a phenomenon that's been imported form your beloved private sector.         

     

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