Good sprint workout for speed ?

Anyone got tips on increasing speed by doing sprints?

Is there a workout plan that does not change that i could use to increase speed and overall distance each week.

I currently run around 9 miles a week split into 3 workouts (Mon,wed, Friday)

I'd like to throw in a sprint session on Saturday so i can increase my overall conditioning while still doing the c210k plan.

Currently do a 34min 5km, i'd like to get it down to 25 at least by May. My legs are conditioned from road cycling so there shouldn't be an issue.

Please note that i run the 34mins with ease and if needed could push for 28 or so mins.

Just for training my pace is slower as i wanted to focus on time rather then speed.

Comments

  • DT19DT19 ✭✭✭
    5k is an aerobic event, you'll get better at it from training your aerobic system by running more miles if you have the time to. 

    If you want to improve form and running efficiency have a look at doing drills and strides within some runs. Im not convinced a dedicated sprinting session will do much for you if your aim is to improve over 5k and you get more out of just running some more miles. 
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited March 1
    Yenzehc said:

    Is there a workout plan that does not change that i could use to increase speed and overall distance each week.
    If it didn't change, how could you achieve your objectives?

    +1 to what DT said.
  • YenzehcYenzehc ✭✭
    > @Ynnec said:
    > Yenzehc said:
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    > Is there a workout plan that does not change that i could use to increase speed and overall distance each week.
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    > If it didn't change, how could you achieve your objectives?
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    > +1 to what DT said.

    By making it a set time ? Simply put every set is worked to failure. I'm not sure if it works in running but it works in Upper body movements.

    Example.

    30 seconds perhaps i run at 4m/s at full speed./

    1 min jog then 30 second sprint full speed..

    there has to be something simple to to get speed up.
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited March 2
    Upper body movements to failure don't rely on the specific aerobic/endurance demands that running does. It's fine to incorporate strides at the end of your workouts but you'll get most benefit from the aerobic development of increased easy mileage; unfortunately, that'll require more time allocated on your part.

    I don't think there's a short cut that doesn't run the risk of injury.

    All the best.
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