Dealing with dog owners

Today, 5.5 mile slow run around the Common and 3 aggressive dogs to deal with.

So whilst I'm spinning round in flipping circles trying to face them and be playful with them, the owners do nothing!  And to top it off, when I pass the owner they say something like "sorry...she's just a bit excited".  And my response is something along the lines of "no worries", when really I feel (1) fortunate to have escaped being bitten, (2) after its sinked in...rather annoyed with the owner because it really isn't okay!!  What is a good approach to handling these stupid owners?

Cheers,

Paul

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Comments

  • Turn the rage on when it happens or do nothing until several hours later when yo can do even more nothing. You could boot the dog as you go by.
  • I normally just shout something like 'can you get your dog under control please'

  • I'd rather boot the owner rather than the dog!  But yes, I need to be a bit more prepared for it and engage the owner.  Sometimes I've seen the same aggressive dog / owner more than once I will sure sort them out next time  Cheers image

  • My mate was walking his dog in the woods and a runner pulled out an extendable whip and hit the dog with it. Where can I get one.
  • Kittenkat...thank you, you are perfectly right.  I know "no worries" shouldn't be my response.  That response was mostly due to the relief of not being bitten!

    I think I read dog language very well as have spent my life around dogs. In fact I find when I run around villages dogs are always very friendly, even very excited and playful, and I love those types of dogs.  I trust them.

    But these aggressive dogs close to where I live were charging and then circling in fight mode as you describe....I find it very scary.  I immediately stop and try to calm them down by talking, whistling and being playful to show I'm not a threat. I just need to make it clear to the owners I'm rather dissatisfied with their lack of control.

    Good luck with your next confrontation with the owners of that Collie - I hope it doesn't happen again image, but if it does go for it image I sure as hell will in future! image

  • Gee Bee - the problem with that is if you really piss the dog off by hurting it you could make it turn against you.  My view is that the best thing to do is give dogs a wide birth and if they do charge, stop and try to show you're friendly and not a threat.  Only once did I have to really shout at a dog continuously as it kept coming at me trying to bite my hands and legs....I was shoving it away cos it was a tiny dog!

  • Paul J-R wrote (see)

    Today, 5.5 mile slow run around the Common and 3 aggressive dogs to deal with.

    So whilst I'm spinning round in flipping circles trying to face them and be playful with them, the owners do nothing!  And to top it off, when I pass the owner they say something like "sorry...she's just a bit excited".  And my response is something along the lines of "no worries", when really I feel (1) fortunate to have escaped being bitten, (2) after its sinked in...rather annoyed with the owner because it really isn't okay!!  What is a good approach to handling these stupid owners?

    Cheers,

    Paul


    dogs are just one of those hazards you have to accept will affect your runs. Especially if you do runs on common ground or woods, and are likely to meet some.

    Sometimes it's best just to stop, protect your nads, and just wait for the owner to close in. That's a "No worries" situation.

    If the dog is physically intimidating you, or digging into your skin in any way, that's the time to do more than merely meekly allow it.  

  • Really can't advocate abusing the animal in any way, they are just doing what comes naturally, it's the onwers who are 100% at fault.

    Some dog owners are just damned inconsiderate, unfortunately.

  • I have the same problem, I nearly always run with my dog and many un-controlled dogs seem to find me and her irresistible, lucky for me that she takes no prisoners  and does not seem to hurt just seriously intimidate! When I ran without her (sports injury) I was attacked by 3 dogs and got bitten on the hand by a big dog and on the ankle by a jack russell when the jack russell came back for a second go I kicked it (not hard, honest) and got verbal abuse from the owner for doing so!! He must have read my mind because he suddenly picked the dog up and ran away! But some time ago I was walking with my wife, four children and two dogs when without warning a runner ran through the middle of all of us nearly tripping over the yorkie who started barking. I would never run closely past a dog on or off the lead, where I run regularly I always say hello to dogs and owners then exchange pleasantries most dogs seem to know me and only hassle me for fuss and a dog treat that I always carry. This is usually a good way to get your point across without seeming obnoxious and aggressive.  It messes up my times but dogs are great, it is the owners that are the problem!

  • E mmyE mmy ✭✭✭
    I've been on both sides and I can honestly say that I'll ever blame the dog but there are some horrific owners it there. I run mostly near farms so I get the possessive dogs (I never run on private land but on the public roads around it). Normally a shout will be enough but I've actually growled at dogs before and it's put them off.



    If you are bitten report it to the police and get the owners details.
  • As a responsible dog owner and trainer this sort of thing makes my blood boil. If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. At my dog club we've found that almost always it takes the owner longer to learn than the dog. Most dogs respond very well to training, it's inherent in the pack dynamics. Look at a mother with her pups - she will always discipline them if they get out of line. Dogs expect to know their place in the hieracrchy and are happier for it. We have had German Shepherds and Swiss White Shepherds for over 30 years - my OH and I are Alpha male and female, our dogs know it and expect to follow our commands. That's not to say we don't spoil them on occasion, nor that we don't have fun and play with them, but they have to learn the rules of good behaviour and are never allowed off leash whenever anyone else is in view.

  • Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

     If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. 

    Just need a few more MPs to get bitten, and I'm sure you'll get your way image

    Hmmm, on second thoughts....having an aggressive dog doesn't sound like such a bad idea! image

  • E mmyE mmy ✭✭✭
    Bionic Ironwolf wrote (see)

    As a responsible dog owner and trainer this sort of thing makes my blood boil. If I had my way, I'd make it compulsory for all owners and their dogs to have to attend basic obedience classes and pass a test. At my dog club we've found that almost always it takes the owner longer to learn than the dog. Most dogs respond very well to training, it's inherent in the pack dynamics. Look at a mother with her pups - she will always discipline them if they get out of line. Dogs expect to know their place in the hieracrchy and are happier for it. We have had German Shepherds and Swiss White Shepherds for over 30 years - my OH and I are Alpha male and female, our dogs know it and expect to follow our commands. That's not to say we don't spoil them on occasion, nor that we don't have fun and play with them, but they have to learn the rules of good behaviour and are never allowed off leash whenever anyone else is in view.

    Completely agree with everything you say.

  • this type of thing works well HARMLESS DOG ZAPPERS

    We got one when we had to run past a house with lots of dobermans running loose. As they could easily clear the fence (and sometimes did), we found the zapper a great help and comfort to have with us on runs!  Haven't used one for ages as normally slowing to a walk and scowling at the owner works!  

    Dogs do have a tendency to chase runners - it's instictive.  

     

  • I was bitten by a dog about 2 years ago, women out with 5 dogs, two fairly large can't remember the breed now, and 3 Jack Russells, no leads and no control.  Whilst I was trying to fend off the big dogs one of the Jacks got in close and buried it's teeth into my calf.  Result for me was A&E  for about 4 hours wait and a course of antibiotics for a week.  I did report her to the police who initially couldn't have given a monkeys initially, when I went back to them later another policeman took up the complaint and she was given a warning.

  • I was once bitten on the bum by a Doberman, presumably just because I was running (it came from behind, so I cannot see how I was seen as a threat).  It was on a lead but held by someone who didn't have the strength to hold it - I'm not overly sympathetic to aggressive dogs.

    I don't really mind dogs that much...  I see great value in them as working dogs and as  companions but...

    • The dog licence should be reintroduced.
    • As bionic said...  compulsory obedience classes.
    • the social conscience of dog owners with respect to fouling has improved greatly, than goodness, but penalties should now be more Draconian and enforced.
    • This should extend to fouling of public trails & bridleways

    I'd also like to see a debate as to whether there should be an enforced sterilisation programme for dangerous breeds.   These breeds have been created by humans...  and in my opinion, some have been mistakes. What is the point of these mega-aggressive breeds - that will happily tear a child to pieces, given the chance?  How many times must we hear "Oh - he was such a good dog - a family pet. I can't believe he's attacked little Johnny"??  All they seem to do, as far as I can see, is spread fear or act as living weapons for thugs.

    Like I say...  just a debate.  I can see merit in that argument but would listen to other views.

  • I have never had any problems with dogs whilst running myself but yesterday I met one rather aggressive and narrow minded owner.

    I was marshalling a race in fields beside a river used mostly by dog walkers. It is a public right of way and this race has been staged for many years.

    When the lead runner went by he asked me if I'd tell the group of walkers coming along if they'd keep their dogs under control. He'd obviously had a problem with them.

    When the walkers finally reached me (at the same time as the mid pack runners were going by) one of the group started yelling at me about how the runners shouldn't be allowed to be there as they were making a mess, etc., etc.. After explaining it was a race I just got a "SO?!" spat in my face. She labelled all runners as rude and when I told her I'd been asked to tell them to keep their dogs under control, all hell let loose!

    They could have saved themselves and me such a lot of grief if they'd just put the dogs on their leads and waited for 10/15 minutes for the majority of runners to have gone by.

    All the other dog walkers seemed to be able to put their dogs on their leads of had them sit and wait for the racers to go by. This one woman made me feel so angry I could've chucked her in the river! image

  • Run Wales wrote (see)

    I'd also like to see a debate as to whether there should be an enforced sterilisation programme for dangerous breeds.   

    Maybe after that we should focus on sterilising the dogs as well........

  • image

  • sorry..somehow I repeated the post from the previous page.  Edited here to delete it.

  • kittenkat wrote (see)
     

     Unfortunately it's not the dog's fault, you are right it's the owners. But so many people take on a dog with no idea or inclination to train it properly. image

     

    Strangely Brown wrote (see)

    Really can't advocate abusing the animal in any way, they are just doing what comes naturally, it's the onwers who are 100% at fault.

    Some dog owners are just damned inconsiderate, unfortunately.

    At what point does it become an animals fault? That it's a dogs natural begaviour to attack and kill other animals it deems weaker isn't a very good excuse for their behaviour. It's not the owners fault that dogs are genetically encoded to kill. Yes some owners exacerbate the problem, but the fact remains that dogs are cold blooded killers.

    No one would put up with a human behaving like a dog, they'd be fined, jailed and in some countries exterminated.

     

     

     

    I love dogs! lmfao

  • like a lot of you i can see both sides as i run with my dog. He now knows not to get in front of runners, and that if a bike is coming he should stop still, and wait for them to go past. I agree with the comment it is 100% the owners fault. The dogs are behaving in a manner which they are allowed to get away with and if trained properly there would be no problem. There is no excuse really. 
    sterilisation can help but is not necessarily the answer, as my dog is not sterilised, but he knows how to behave. 

    Its not always the agressive ones that are a problem either, I was once greeted by an over enthusiastic dog that just ran full pelt into my leg and flipped me on my stomach, then proceeding to lick my face while i lay there winded. Yuk! 

    If i am running and am not sure about an approaching dog, i will always walk past it, as a running person can trigger a chase response in a dog and make things worse whether you are running towards them or away from them. Dogs on leads are always more aggressive as they feel trapped so are very defensive, give them a wide berth if not sure. 

    luckily i have never met a dog which is dangerously aggressive towards me (just towards my dog, but as he is a jack russell he can look after himself image

    as a dog lover its such a shame to see how some owners lack of responsibility has affected some peoples attitude towards dogs, and i feel for those that have been attacked. 

    I hate people who dont clear up the dog muck too, but even worse are the people who pick it up then hang it on a tree or leave it by the side of the trail. I would rather  they left it to decompose naturally in a few weeks than left it in a plastic bag where is going to take years!  

    i experienced a similar problem to Small, running a race recently that had a beach section, and a local dog walking group thought it was ok to walk on masse along the beach, getting in the way of the runners, and letting their dogs run in among us and through the finish funnell!.  Apparantly the race 'shouldnt have been allowed' and they 'didnt see why it should affect their walk' even though its once a year! 
    There are good folks and bad folks (and dogs) on both sides.  image

     

  • Does anyone have advice for how to become better able to deal with dogs when running?

    I was attacked by a neighbour's dog, then a friend's dog as a child, which has left me terrified of them. I've had several bad experiences since, partly as I think they can tell I'm scared.

    One problem is I can't tell the difference between an agressive dog and one who just wants to play. As soon as a dog runs towards me, barks or jumps around me I panic. I might hyperventilate, shout, cry etc - all involuntary. I've met a few very understanding owners recently who put dogs on leads or make them sit when they see runners, but many  make a comment along the lines of "she's only playing" which doesn't help me in the slightest.

    I strongly believe there is no excuse for allowing a dog to behave aggresively towards a person, and that these dogs should be better trained.I feel sorry for the people on this thread who have had some nasty experiences.

    I also wish more owners would realise not everyone loves dogs, and not allow their dog to run at people, or jump up at them, unless the person clearly wants to play too. However, I fully acept my response is extreme, and not helpful either. The thought of being hassled by dogs puts me off running in many open areas, and I'd like change this.

    I've read tips about showing you are not a threat etc, but these go out of my mind when I see a dog running at me, and the flight response sets in. I need to practice these things in a safe environment. I know some people on this thread are experienced in dog training. Are there courses that people can go on to get more used to dogs and start to understand their behaviour?

  • I don't know if it works for everyone but I find that not making eye contact with an approaching dog seems to make them lose interest. I've certainly not been bothered by dogs whilst running. But then I quite like dogs too, especially if well behaved.

  • Have never really had a problems - was once bitten on the arm when out running by a rottweiller which was on the lead - I stopped and waited and it just flew up at me. The owners response was to kick the dog, which I thought explained the dogs behaviour perfectly - My response was to have a go at the owner for kicking the dog.  Fortunately no real damage done.

    I was also chased, last winter running along the sea wall near where I live, by a dog which came at me from out of the darkness - being dark it appeared to be a big black dog with no owner apparently around - I am afraid my response to that was to scream at the dog and chase it - it ran like hell and has chased me since. I now know the dog is a Red Setter and very friendly - in the dark it could have been the hound of the baskervilles. I did once get chased by what i  thought was a dog in Bulgaria, it turned out to be a bear, fortunately (for me not the bear) it was one of those gypsy dancing bears and the chain it was attached to bought it up sharpe - I did suddenly develope runners trots though.

  • JF50 wrote (see)

    Cold and dry this morning with a good moon to help make it look a lot lighter.  NW was two muntjac deer and what I imagined was 3 wolves.  About a mile down the trail I see 3 sets of eyes reflecting back at me in the beam of my headtorch, probably 30 yards or so ahead, they are either very brazen deer or somethings escaped from the zooimage  .  I slowed down as they started to come towards me and I can see it is two alsations and another reasonable sized dog, so that's ok it's not wolves that are going to take me down.  As the dogs start barking I suddenly see a torch go on about 20 yards away and the owner informs me "they won't hurt you", as I told him probably easier for him to say  than for me to believe.  I thought my running the trail in the dark could be classed as bizarre behaviour but I think taking 3 dogs out for a walk and not using a light really is bizarre

    This was a post I put on a different thread about 10 days ago.  I think I must be unlucky with dogsimage

  • Jane, I do worry about meeting someone like you with my dog. She is a fantastic dog well trained and disciplined (no I never hit or hurt her) but I suspect that even she would be unpredictable if she met you; I suspect she could interpret your nerves as aggression. She thinks everyone is her friend and everyone fusses her and says how wonderful she is. She is a pleasure to walk/run with and just runs around looking for scents etc. I would suggest watching a few episodes of 'The Dog Whisperer' good old Caesar Milan is a bit of a loon but comes out with some good stuff about dog psychology.

    Lardarse; you would not call my dog 'a cold blooded killer' if you saw her fussing our pet rabbits and chickens then chasing, catching next doors cat (that takes too much of an interest in the chickens and rabbits) before letting it go and chasing it again!

    And +1 for the people who bag up dog muck and chuck it somewhere? Or do not clear it up (Max's Mum) it does my nutimage

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