Are you and "in" or an "out"?

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Comments

  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    2308 said:

    A lot of people would be very angry if remainers are allowed to have a  second bite at the cherry.

    Oh noes! A bunch of angry xenophobes!

    Am I bothered?

    2308 said:

    Theresa May won't be turfed out before the EU situation is resolved one way or another. 

    Never say never.

    2308 said:

    She opposes a second referendum, so you are unlikely to get one.

    The 2099 negotiation extension would suffice.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    May keeps saying that her deal "delivers on the central demands of the voters".  But as you say, 2308, what the voters voted on was "leave" or "remain".  It's like serving a 5 course meal of your choice to someone on the basis that they liked the picture on the front of the menu. "No deal", "Good deal", "Bad deal" - they all deliver on the result of the referendum, because there was no detail in there. Whether an individual voted on the grounds of economics, immigration, sovereignty, Gibraltar, Ireland, cocking a snook at those pesky foreigners, or the smell of cheese is totally irrelevant when we weren't actually asked that.

    I voted remain, but hey, I'm all for democracy. It's pretty obvious that no-one in government actually thought the vote would be to leave, or they may have made a few plans beforehand.  Cameron just pissed off into the sunset and left the rest to it.

    I find it a huge contrast to the Scottish independence referendum.  Whatever side of the fence you were on with that one, the ducks were at least swimming towards a row before the vote took place - in that most things had been discussed and debated, if not agreed on how they would look post-independence if that had been the result. I can see a second referendum looming there.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    And I agree that May is pretty safe, as in the game of pass the parcel, she is holding the parcel and it's ticking......
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] ✭✭✭
    edited November 2018
    Looks like the Spanish might scupper the Brexit agreement over Gibraltar. 
    Still not sure what Labours approach to Brexit is. Looking at their website they want Brexit in name only and want to remain in Customs Union and Single Market. They are giving out mixed messages on a second referendum. 
  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭
    Meanwhile the masses are stocking up with sugar and ciggies, hoping it'll all be over by Christmas.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    Should we open a book on the next PM?
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    Simon Cowell's currently 200/1 at Betfair.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    I'd probably prefer him to Mr 1922 if it came to a vote.
  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭
    How much for your thoughts TM?
  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭

    And so it came to pass.
  • Not sure what to think anymore. FWIW I voted out and stand by my convictions. I fear theres a stitch up going on myself. Country is headed up by a remainer (cameron) who reluctantly gave in to pressure and gave us a vote. The vote goes the opposite way to what he expected so he resigns and another remainer takes his place? I can't honestly see that this will have a good ending. Out (but not really), still paying vast amounts to the EU and still not really in control of our own destiny. 

    However......


    None of this BS


    will stop me running!
  • YnnecYnnec ✭✭✭
    edited December 2018
    2308 said:

    My interpretation of Article 50 is that once a state invokes it, it can't change its mind all by itself, unilaterally. Article 50 is a complete statement on what happens after that.

    In other words a second resolution (which a lot of people keep clamouring for) wouldn't serve very much purpose on its own, because the UK can't just change its mind about leaving, without the agreement of all the other 27 EU countries.


    Looks like the UK can cancel Brexit by revoking Article 50 after all.

    Odds on a 2nd referendum are shortening:


  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    Colin is a seemingly infinite warehouse of nonsense.
  • RicFRicF ✭✭✭
    I thought Article 50 was based on the assumption that any country leaving was actually being ejected by the others.

    It's become like a marriage break up where the parties separation terms are compromised, because they can't resolve the issue of how to make a clean break of it without retaining the option of shagging the arse off each other.
  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    Assuming that Article 50 can be unilaterally revoked, and there is a second referendum, what will the options be?  Presumably if the vote goes for leaving again, we'll have to invoke A50 again, and start the negotiations with the EU all over again.  So it won't be a "stay v May's deal" because May's deal won't exist anymore, and I can't see the EU giving more if we have pissed them about.

    The government couldn't run a bath at the moment....................
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