Are you and "in" or an "out"?

1235749

Comments

  • He is a public figure I guess. We had a 'survey' the other week that said that Paddington and Sherlock Holmes would have been in favour of Brexit.



    (i doubt that Paddington would be - but who knows ?)
  • PhilPubPhilPub ✭✭✭

    Paddington wouldn't get a vote anyway, he's from Peru.  (Coming over here, stealing all our marmalade...)

    And he's a bear.

  • How long do you have to have been here for to get a vote? (Serious question)

    Paddington has been here since 1958 so, ignoring the bear point, surely has a vote? (Non serious response to your above comment)

     

  • DachsDachs ✭✭✭

    One of the worst things about the referendum is the term "Brexit".  After Thursday, it should be outlawed.  Ideally by a new European Directive following a Remain vote. 

  • Have we outed him as an illegal ?



    Will we have to deport him now ?



    Sad days indeed. image
  • HA77HA77 ✭✭✭

    I you have to be British, Irish or a Commonwealth citizen with indefinite leave to remain to vote. I don't think there's a time for which you have to have been here. I'm Australian and get to vote. I've said it before but it seems a bit strange as back home you have to be an Australian citizen to vote. And voting is compulsory, which on the whole I think is a good thing (apart from when I've got a fine for not voting).

  • PhilPubPhilPub ✭✭✭
    Skinny Fetish Fan wrote (see)

    How long do you have to have been here for to get a vote? (Serious question)

    Paddington has been here since 1958 so, ignoring the bear point, surely has a vote? (Non serious response to your above comment)

     

    Who can vote in the EU referendum? 

    "British, Irish and Commonwealth citizens who live in the UK, along with Britons who have lived abroad for less than 15 years, are eligible to vote."

    So I suppose technically no matter how long you've lived here, if you've not applied for citizenship, you can't vote??  I'm sure in practise anyone who has lived here since 1958 is likely to be a British citizen.  But yes this is all somewhat trumped by the fictional animated character's lack of human-ness.

    I thought the film was quite good actually, although I've got a soft spot for Sally Hawkins.  image

  • NessieNessie ✭✭✭
    PhilPub wrote (see)
    Muttley wrote (see)

    Thank you, Mr Beckham, for letting us know your view on which way to vote. But you're a footballer. Why should anyone care what you think about the EU?

    For that matter, why should anyone care what make of razor he uses or pants he wears?  Ask Gillette or Calvin Klein.  image

    Well, he has inside knowledge of being an economic migrant to other EU countries.

     

  • I'm pretty sure you need to be human and non fictional to be able to voteimage 

  • Dachs wrote (see)

    One of the worst things about the referendum is the term "Brexit".  After Thursday, it should be outlawed.  Ideally by a new European Directive following a Remain vote. 

    No, Europe - hands off our neologisms!

  • SlowkoalaSlowkoala ✭✭✭

    My in-laws are non fictional, vaguely human and have lived in England for 60+ years but can't vote on Thursday. They get to vote in Italian elections though.

    I can't see Paddington in the YouGov chart, but Fireman Sam and Postman Pat are both remainers so that's clinched it for me.

    It's weird how pro-leavers are saying what Beckham says is irrelevant as he's not an expert, given how much they are choosing to listen to the experts.

  • skottyskotty ✭✭✭

    I'll see your Beckham and raise you Cheggers.

    Brexit wheeling out the big nobs.

    Or not..

     

  • runner-manrunner-man ✭✭✭

    If anyone going to believe David Beckham, then I'm going to believe Joey Essex. He wants Britain to remain in Essex.

  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    With Paddington he's deeply opposed to the work time directive and maternity rights. Bears are like that. Apparently Winnie The Pooh thinks the whole Jo Cox murder was a false flag operation. But then he is a bear of very little brain.
  • JT141JT141 ✭✭✭
    I like this fact someone told me today. In 2014 we had just under 8.5million foreign born people in the UK. And we had approx 23million sheep. What we've got people is a sheep crisis.
  • Are you suggesting we start eating the foreign born people?

    Shouldn't take too long to polish off 790,000 of them.image

  • We can't eat them, but we could shear them I suppose.

  • Are they like Swans ? Do all Foreigners belong to the Queen ?
  • JT141 wrote (see)
    I like this fact someone told me today. In 2014 we had just under 8.5million foreign born people in the UK. And we had approx 23million sheep. What we've got people is a sheep crisis.

    image

  • kaffeegkaffeeg ✭✭✭
    PhilPub wrote (see)

    Paddington wouldn't get a vote anyway, he's from Peru.  (Coming over here, stealing all our marmalade...)

    And he's a bear.

     

    Skinny Fetish Fan wrote (see)

    How long do you have to have been here for to get a vote? (Serious question)

    Paddington has been here since 1958 so, ignoring the bear point, surely has a vote? (Non serious response to your above comment)

     

    Paddington was (is?) an illegal immigrant. He could (should?) have sought asylum on immediately entering the country on the basis of persecution (Destroying his habitat). But he didn't. Which means he'll be put in a detention centre for some time.  Being in the EU or not, would have no impact on other Peruvian bears from illegally entering the country. 

    And on another note: my mum (Austrian national)... Been in the UK for 49 years and can Not vote. She never applied for UK citizenship, because she didn't need to. Until Friday 24th June.......

  • Whilst I look enviously at the UV filtration system used in Holland, and the idea of getting chlorine out of the water supply (and air supply in regard to showers), it looks like we would have more control as a nation by leaving. I think the EU has been really substandard as an organisation in terms of getting its message across and telling people what it is all about. image

     

  • They've probably been busy doing things rather than printing pamphlets and wasting money ? We all know people at work that bang on about how brilliant they are, rather than actually doing their jobs.



    We may have more control if we leave - but I think the loss of trade, benefits, influence, protection that we get from the EU more than makes up for it.



    Its like leaving your footy team if you don't like being told what to do, and then going off and playing a match by yourself and being surprised that you aren't doing as well.
  • If you mean some of the nastier members of the present government having more "control" yes, I'm pretty sure that will happen - be careful what you wish for.

    There is absolutely nothing to stop them investing in housing, schools and the NHS except a lack of political will. So what makes you think it's going to happen if we leave the EU?

     

     

  • Screamapillar wrote (see)

    If you mean some of the nastier members of the present government having more "control" yes, I'm pretty sure that will happen - be careful what you wish for.

    There is absolutely nothing to stop them investing in housing, schools and the NHS except a lack of political will. So what makes you think it's going to happen if we leave the EU?

     

     

    Quite. And since it's the more right-wing element of the Tories that want out, I wouldn't hold out much hope for the NHS they're all crying crocodile tears for.

  • M..o.useM..o.use ✭✭✭

    What you mean they won't be spending the extra £350m a week on the NHS after all?

    image

  • runner-manrunner-man ✭✭✭

    I do fear whatever the result this Friday. If we leave, who knows. If we remain, yes we will be saved but at what cost. A tory government with a sizeable number to create problems for Cameron and Osborne.

    I believe staying in is the right option. My mum is Italian and came over here along with many other Italians in the 1950s. She came over here to better herself. She had to go through the hard way. No freedom of movement. More stricter in those days. She worked in the NHS. Got married, raised five kids. She learnt English and got involved in the local community. So coming over here gave my Mum that opportunity.

    I worked for a firm which have staff mostly from Poland. My firm mostly recruits more from Europe than British. Not to be insulting, but British workers are not as productive, willing and hard-working. Where as those my firm recruits want to work hard, see our wages as a luxury, but like my Mum, they want to better themselves.

    Immigration is a benefit to this country. Staying in the EU would continue and welcome more to come to Britain. In fact I think the EU should become bigger opening the market to more people. I also think this country must one day join the Euro. I also think one day the EU parliament should control every EU country.

    So being part of Europe is not at all bad. But this country needs to be part of the European project where one day we are all Europeans.

     

  • I don't think trade will be that affected. Money finds a way of making money and the UK is too big and rich (overall) to be frozen out.

    I don't take a great deal of interest in politics, but I would suggest that leaving the EU would allow for the more precise management of government expenditure in regard to, relatively, local issues.

    The EU doesn't present itself well; it comes across as being an unelected political body which supersedes national law, and very little reason is given to people about why this should be the case.

     

     

  • runner-manrunner-man ✭✭✭

    The EU may be seen as a unelected political body. But Britain could have played a stronger role if Gordon Brown had his way for Tony Blair to be EU president. Sadly David Cameron block this. Would have been better to have a British in charge.

    We as citizen's do have the vote to elect a Member of European Parliament every four years who represents each region. Sadly not many bother to vote which is why there are so many UKIP MEPs who are happy to be paid but love to screw the system.

  • I think you're simplifying things Ricky.



    If Money finds a way of making Money - then why aren't you voting with the leaders of just about every large company in Britain ? Witness the letter from 1,280 UK business leaders from 51 FTSE 100 companies, backing the campaign to keep the UK in the EU.



    Surely you'd go with them ? Or the ten nobel-prize winning economists, 5,000 scientists and 1,000 academics have have made a joint appeal to voters urging them to vote to Remain.



    I'd be going with those people who have studied the issues.



    We will face increased barriers and tax to export to Europe. Why would you be in a club (the EU) if you didnt get preferential treatment over such things ?



    Allowing more precise management of Government Expenditure ? How much do you think the Government pays the EU as a % of its total spending ? 10% ? 20% ? 40% ?



    It's more like 1% - so with Boris and co having ridiculously over committed on his savings - the Vote Leave has made ??111bn in spending promises - more than ten times the net ??10bn saving they claim would be made on a ???Yes??? vote



    Come Friday if it goes his way he will have to do a lot of back pedalling.



    EU Unelected ? So you didn't vote for your MEP ? Do you vote for everyone too ? All the government officials who we can't vote into place - and how would you be in a position to judge anyway ? It;s not X factor and we can't have several candidates for say the position of Treasurer showing us their spreadsheets live on stage ?



    If you haven't thought long and hard about the consequences - don't vote.



    For gods sake don't vote Leave on your gut feeling.
  • Ricky Bennison wrote (see)

    I don't think trade will be that affected. Money finds a way of making money and the UK is too big and rich (overall) to be frozen out.

    I don't take a great deal of interest in politics, but I would suggest that leaving the EU would allow for the more precise management of government expenditure in regard to, relatively, local issues.

    The EU doesn't present itself well; it comes across as being an unelected political body which supersedes national law, and very little reason is given to people about why this should be the case.

     

     

    Sorry to digress, but are you THE Ricky Bennison, of Greek urn fame?

Sign In or Register to comment.